COLLEGE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

 

COLLEGE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES

(AFRICAN STUDENTS ONLY-

OFFERED ONLINE ONLY)

 

  

Advanced LEADERSHIP TRAINING

Certificate Program

 

Introduction

Leadership is one of those things that are often awfully hard to define but you know when you see it, and you definitely know when it’s missing.

This exciting leadership development program has been designed to have an immediate impact on individuals and organizations as it merges best practice theory and your work-related experience to create a broad skill set. It is practical, contemporary and focuses on both personal and professional development.

Being an effective leader requires a range of skills including self-awareness, communication, empathy, vision, delegation, critical thinking, creative problem solving, and motivation techniques and instilling inspiration in others.  Learn best practice leadership skills you can implement immediately.

You may have some people who now have to ‘step up to the plate’ and take on far more of a leadership role than previously. You may need them to demonstrate the kind of leadership behaviors that others aspire to.

There may be managers who have to take the next step and go beyond being good or even excellent managers, to become inspirational leaders within the business.

Our approach is to run leadership programs where natural leaders can develop the skill and insight to become great ones. And where fledgling leaders learn to lead with  flair and authenticity.

Good leaders have always been expected to be able to solve new problems, capitalize on new opportunities and navigate through the ever-changing landscape of business. Leadership is a complex process by which the leader influences others to perform and achieve. The leadership attributes-belief, values, ethics, character, knowledge and skills – are all traits, which can be learned.

Leadership Development may be just what you need to help your whole company progress to the next level. Our Leadership Certificate training Programs are intensive, provocative and very challenging. Are you up for it?

Leadership Training Objectives

 

  • Understanding good leadership behaviors
  • Learning the difference between leadership and management
  • Gaining insight into your patterns, beliefs and rules
  • Defining qualities and strengths
  • Determining how well you perceive what’s going on around you
  • Polishing interpersonal skills and communication Skills
  • Learning about commitment and how to move things forward
  • Making key decisions
  • Handling your and other people’s stress
  • Empowering, motivating and inspiring others
  • Leading by example
  • So what exactly is a leader?

Leadership Development and Training programs

Our Leadership Development and Training programs push each and every delegate to gain a rigorous personal insight into what makes them tick and then, with that understanding of themselves, to stretch their ‘comfort zones’ into new and challenging territory.

Coupled with this we focus on their ability to see what’s going on. This is the one essential quality that anyone in any position of leadership must develop. Whether you’re running a company, running a church fete or running a home, you can’t excel unless you can see things from all points of view.

Once you develop your ‘seeing’ skills then you develop the skills that make things happen, get things unstuck, move things forward. You can look at creating a vision, motivating and inspiring others, setting clear agendas and supporting those who need to help make your vision become a reality.

 Essential Skills of Leadership

  • Authenticity
  • Good communication
  • Being articulate
  • Thinking on your feet
  • Good humor
  • Flexibility
  • Integrity
  • Compelling presence
  • Empathy
  • Taking on a leadership role

Who Should Attend

Texas’s tremendously large and increasingly diverse leadership student population in the public schools, private and community colleges presents numerous and significant challenges for educational leaders. The pressure of greater accountability for higher leadership student achievement in an environment of uncertain and diminishing resources is one such challenge.

Our leadership training programs benefits Team Leaders, Project Managers, Middle Managers, Supervisors, Executives, and Team Members and anyone else who is or will be responsible for managing teams or individuals, anyone who interacts with internal or external customers, project team leaders, employees who serve on teams or managers who want to enhance other skills through team leadership development in order to achieve outstanding results.

Method of Delivery

This is a highly interactive Leadership Certification Program based on the application of theoretical concepts of leadership to practical situations that faced by newly appointed managers. Participants will work in individual or small groups throughout the course to apply the learning to real issues and leadership challenges. Practical exercises and case studies will be used extensively during the course

Leadership Training Format

Being an inspirational leader requires a set of skills which can be learned.  With patience, persistence, hard work and this Leadership Training course, you too can become a highly effective leader. This course provides the basics for understanding what leadership is and what leaders do to be successful

This comprehensive, 7 weeks Leadership Training course teaches skills like how to be a leader with a vision, situational leadership, how to know oneself, setting your team’s objectives, expectations and goals, communicating with confidence and clarity, creative problem solving & decision making methods, how to lead and motivate your team in a changing environment, managing conflicts and much more.

The Leadership Training Course format is offered in various formats.  The more popular programs are offered as 7 weeks.

 

Week 1         Getting Started and the Evolution of Leadership

 

Module 1      Workshop Objectives

Module 2      Defining Leadership

Module 3      Characteristics of a Leader

Module 4      Leadership Principles

Module 5      A Brief History of Leadership

Module 6      Three Theories of Leadership

Week 2        Types of Leaderships and Introduction to Leadership & Leadership effectiveness

Module 1      Participative Leadership

Module 2      Situational Leadership

Module 3      Contingency-Based Leadership

Module 4      Transformational Leadership

Module 5      Successful Leaders Behaviors

Module 6      Tools and techniques involve in Leadership Role

Module 7      Complexity in Leadership Management

Module 8      Leadership qualities

 

Week 3                     The Nature of Management

Module 1      Recognize the types of activities, rules, and responsibilities

Module 2      Management positions

Module 3      Understanding Challenges in a Job Place

Module 4      Techniques to cope with the Pressures

Module 5      Management and problem solving

Module 6      Similarities and Differences Managers and Leadership Roles

 

Week 4          Leadership Communication and Problem Solving

Module 1      Basics of effective Communication

Module 2      Verbal and non-verbal communication

Module 3      The art of listening and Conducting effective meetings

Module 4      Strategic to Problem solving

Module 5      Problem solving steps

Module 6      The Leader as a problem solver

 

Week 5         Leadership Motivation and Management of Change

Module 1      Principles of motivation

Module 2      Motivation theories and their application

Module 3      Guidelines for setting SMART goals

Module 4      The need for positive change in times of adversity

Module 5      Psychology of resistance to change

Module 6     Common pitfalls in wrong decision-making

 

Week 6         Ethics and Leadership for Team Leaders

Module 1      Character and Integrity

Module 2      Ethics and Values

Module 3      Building excellence

Module 4      Positive influential team leader

Module 5      Developing high performance teams

Module 6      Team Maturity & Leader behaviors

 

Week 7          LEADERSHIP FIELD TRIP (PRACTICUM)

Background Information

The Certificate in Leadership Program advances knowledge in the field through its distinctive objectives and learning outcomes, equipping individual, managers, district, and policy leaders with competencies grounded in strategic thinking and applied research. Certification Program Leadership students will have rich opportunities to participate in externally funded basic research projects on key leadership and policy issues. Additionally, Certification Program Leadership students will develop the skills to be effective leaders because within the curriculum a practical skill based component has been infused in each training session. Each module in the program will reflect each of the three themes and include topics assignments and fieldwork to develop the knowledge, skills, and dispositions leading to the program goals identified.

 

After completing this course, participants will be able to: Outcome:

  • Be a leader with a vision; not just a manager
  • Define practical leadership qualities
  • Understand Situational Leadership
  • Gain a better understanding of your self
  • Influence with passion and empower others to act
  • Increase the performance of your team by setting objectives, expectations and goals
  • Communicate with confidence and clarity so you are always understood
  • Use creative problem solving & decision making methods
  • Improve your influence by developing listening and questioning skills
  • Give critical feedback to inspire greater performance
  • Identify and manage conflict within the team
  • Lead and motivate your team in a changing environment

Academic Responsibilities

  1. Each leadership certification student is expected to take an active role in the learning process by meeting course requirements as specified in written syllabi.
  2. Each leadership certification student is expected to display appropriate conduct in classroom situations that will enhance the learning environment.
  3. Faculty members have the right to establish classroom standards of behavior and attendance requirements. Leadership certification students will be expected to meet these requirements and make contact with faculty members when unable to do so.
  4. Each leadership certification student is expected to maintain academic ethics and honesty in all its forms, including, but not limited to, cheating and plagiarism as defined hereafter:
    1. Cheating is the act of using or attempting to use or providing others with unauthorized information, materials or study aids in certification work. Cheating includes, but is not limited to, passing examination answers to or taking examinations for someone else, or preparing or copying other’s academic work.
    2. Plagiarism is the act of appropriating another person’s or group’s ideas or work (written, computerized, artistic, etc.) or portions thereof and passing them off as the product of one’s own work in any academic exercise or activity.
    3. Fabrication is the use of invented information or the falsification of exercise or other findings. Examples include but are not limited to:
      1. Citation of information not taken from the source indicated. This may include the incorrect documentation of secondary source materials.
      2. Listing sources in a bibliography not used in the academic exercise.
      3. Submission in a paper, certification exercise, program report or other program exercise of falsified, invented, or fictitious data or evidence, or deliberate and knowing concealment or distortion of the true nature, origin, or function of such data or evidence.
      4. Submitting as your own any academic exercise, (e.g., written work, printing, sculpture, etc.) prepared totally or in part by another.
    4. The institution expects all leadership certification students to maintain integrity and high standards of individual honesty in academic work, to obey the law, and to show respect for others.

Bachelors of Art Degree in Procurement, Chain Supply and Logistics

Length of Study-3 years

INTRODUCTION:

The bachelor’s degree program delivers a broader education that offers West Africa students the opportunity to select focused electives. The bachelor’s degree program delivers the education necessary to pursue entry-level management positions.

You can expect to take courses that focus on the development of strong business and management skills. Elective courses develop knowledge of specific areas in industry, including retail management. Programs emphasize information systems, negotiation techniques, and operations management.

In addition, some curricula are designed to prepare Africa students for graduate study. Some programs prepare students to take West African industry-standard Certification exams.

The procurement industry offers a range of occupations in sales, purchasing, and logistics. Specialists in the industry evaluate target markets, define customer requirements, and identify goods and services at prices that benefit employers. Procurement professionals understand supply chain management, sourcing, and negotiation techniques. Employers seek job candidates who possess strong communication, asset management, and inventory control skills.

The undergraduate program in Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management is designed in response to a steadily growing demand for African professionals capable of executing and managing operations in the procurement, warehousing, inventory management, and transporting of goods in an increasingly global market and business environment.

During your coursework, you will look at all types of supply chains to include service sector, reverse logistics, sustainability, and green logistics. To help you build a well-rounded skillset, Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management degree program incorporates foundational knowledge in several related disciplines, including accounting, economics, finance, information systems, and management. Integrating hands-on, applied learning with theory, and the international regulatory framework governing the global movement of goods.  All Covenant International University and Seminary –College of International Studies degrees are designed to deliver a transformative learning experience that is flexible to accommodate your personal and work life.

Program Regulations Studies and examinations for a Bachelor’s Degree in Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management shall be governed by the general regulations and statutes of Covenant International University and Seminary – College of International Studies in Sierra Leon and  in addition by the regulations of the Covenant International University and Seminary – College of International Studies in Texas, USA.

 

ENTRY REQUIREMENT

A candidate must successfully complete the International diploma certification or Diploma Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management, and a minimum of four (4) West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE), plus two (2) years working experience in Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management.

DURATION OF THE PROGRAM

The program is developed for 156 weeks.

OBJECTIVES

  • Describe supply chain drivers and the metrics used in evaluating them
  • Analyze the design, planning, and activities of logistics networks which support domestic and global supply chain operations
  • Formulate a framework for a viable and sustainable supply chain and defend it by identifying and addressing relevant supply chain drivers
  • Collaborate in teams to make decisions pertaining to operation of supply chains and logistics networks
  • Communicate supply chain decisions in a professional written and oral manner
  • Systematically and objectively gather, record and analyze data for aid in making supply chain decisions
  • Recognize when changes in the environment require adjustments to the supply chain, and how to make those changes in a collaborative way
  • Use a systems perspective to integrate many pieces of information across the supply chain into a single guideline for decision and action.
  • Integrate and leverage the Internet and information technology into the supply chain.

Logistics Management Projects you may Select: 

  • Driving Revenues
  • Strategic Marketing Process
  • Fulfilling Supply Chain Demand
  • Securing Resources
  • Integrating the Supply Chain

Performance Outcomes

The Covenant International University and Seminary –College of International

studies degree in Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management will give you a solid understanding of supply chain and logistics management from both West Africa and global perspective.

You will develop and refine basic business concepts, analytical skills, business communication, problem solving, and decision making methods, preparing you to be a dynamic asset to any team. Your coursework also includes coverage of leading-edge supply chain strategies, including global logistics management and Radio-Frequency Identification (RFID), which puts you instantly ahead of the game.

The largest corporations have logistics to thank for their success, and with a strong focus on productivity, those with this degree are primed to step into nearly any industry.

Courses and Requirements

A bachelor’s degree program teaches West African students a range of important business concepts in addition to logistical, procurement   and supply chain management theories. You can expect to take courses in supply chain strategy, business-to-business marketing, operations management, financial management, organizational behavior, transportation management, and information systems.

A candidate must successfully complete the International diploma certification or Diploma Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management, and a minimum of four (4) West African Senior School Certificate Examination (WASSCE), plus two (2) years working experience in Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management.

Some programs offer research projects that explore specific issues faced by real companies. In addition, your program might provide the opportunity to participate in special projects that utilize common technologies used in the industry.

 

Curriculum

Major Requirements:  All courses are 4 credit hours.

   312 WEEKS  CURICULUM
WEEK 1-4
BSPL 1310 Supply Chain Sourcing
WEEK 5-8
FIN 3201 West African Elements of Taxation
WEEK 9-12
MGT 3202 Human Resource Mgt.
WEEK 13-16
BSPL 3211 Strategic Procurement
WEEK 17-20
BSPL 3212 Procurement Contracts Mgt.
WEEK 21-24
BSPL 2315 Supply Chain Management Systems
WEEK 25-28
MGT 2116 Elements of Production Mgt.
WEEK 29-32
BSPL 2109 Public& Nonprofit procurement
WEEK 33-36
MGT 3105 Entrepreneurship Development.
WEEK 37-40
BSPL 3520 Business Systems Analytics/Operations Management
WEEK 41-44
BSPL 3625 Business Law and International Governance
WEEK 45-48
FIN 2204 Principles of Economics and Accounting
WEEK 49-52
FIN 2165 Financial Management
WEEK 53-56
MGT 2117 Research Methods
WEEK 57-60
MGT 2187 Strategic Management
WEEK 61-64
BSPL 3340 Cost Accounting and Finance
WEEK 65-68
BSPL 2330 West African Transnational Marketing Strategies
WEEK 69-72
BSPL 2105 Procurement Ethics
WEEK 73-76
BSPL 3335 Quality Management
WEEK 77-80
BSPL 4415 International Trade Policy, Regulation and Ethics
WEEK 81-84
BSPL 3210 Logistics & distribution Mgt
WEEK 85-88
BSPL 1420 Global Logistics Management
WEEK 89-92
BSPL 4015 Store, Warehouse and Inventory Management
WEEK 93-96
BSPL 4110 West African Electronic Commerce and Distribution Channels
WEEK 97-100
BSPL 4125 Global Procurement and Strategic Sourcing
WEEK 101-104
BSPL 4351 Emerging Trends in Supply Chain and Logistics Management
WEEK 105-108
BSPL 4460 Supply Chain Strategy
WEEK 109-112
BSPL 4530 West African Global Business Law
WEEK 113-116
MGT 1105 Business communication skills
WEEK 117-120
BUC 1105 Information Communication Technology
WEEK 121-124
BSPL 1105 Principles of Procurement & Supply Chain Mgt
WEEK 125-128
FIN 3151 west African Economy
WEEK 129-132
BSPL 3105 Procurement Bus Negotiations
WEEK 133-136
BSPL 3106 International Procurement
(In addition to the Major Requirements, all Covenant International University and Seminary –College of Business and Technology students must complete
WEEK 137-140
PLS 5400 West African Vision and Values
WEEK 141-144
PLS 5410 West African Tradition and Change
WEEK 145-148
PLS 5420 West African Freedom and Responsibility
WEEK 149-156
INTERNSSHIP-SEE BELOW

Outcome:

In your classes, you’ll learn about integrating and leveraging the use of the Internet and information technology to make informed business decisions, appropriately applying the roles of both leader and follower in organizations,  and interpreting financial data to support decision-making.

Upon graduating with a BS in Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management, and a certificate in Procurement, Supply Chain and Logistics Management,, you will have the west African business knowledge and logistics management skills necessary to succeed in fast-growing business careers.

 

FACILITIES—(ONLINE)

The program requires the provision of the following facilities / resources:

  1. A functional computer laboratory with internet facilities
  2. Functional Office and Classrooms
  3. A modern library with stocks of current, journals and magazines reflective of the contemporary business world.

Teaching

The course is delivered in four blocks of three day intensive study periods, followed by independent study and online support through the University’s virtual learning environment, Blackboard. Each module is taken and assessed over a six week block.

Teaching is delivered through a combination of lectures, seminars and tutorials, using a wide range of learning activities.

STAFFING

For this program, the minimum requirement for an average class size will be five (5) teaching staff with at least two (2) senior lecturers. Some of the staff teaching professional subjects should have relevant / practical experience.

Internship

This involves working on a company project. The majority of internships are voluntary positions, which support work experience with a company in a particular sector. A number of projects exist for suitable students, in many cases students are supported in finding and securing internships with the support of the School’s Administrators.

  • Three (3) months commercial project, undertaken full or part-time with the host company.
  • Internships are often voluntary positions providing interesting project experience, some positions are paid – potentially up to 86 UNITE Projects are available in 2009-16 in West Africa.
  • 30-40 minute commercial presentation and 10,000 word professional Presentation at the end of Internship.

Assessment

Over the duration of your course a range of assessment techniques will be used. Types of assessment include; essays, assignments, exams, multiple choice tests, online tests, group reports, and portfolio work.

 

 Bachelor of Art in Democracy and Good Governance-Master of Arts in Global Leadership

 DESCRIPTION:

The ACCELERATED PROGRAM In Bachelor of Art in Democracy and Good Governance-Master of Arts in Global Leadership Studies is an online, research-based, interdisciplinary degree that seeks to facilitate the leadership abilities and roles of men and women working in inter-cultural, cross-cultural, and/or international contexts.

Students in this program seek enhanced credentials or leadership positions within academic or ministry/political focused organizations. This program is flexibly designed for working adults who:

  • Have the intellectual capacity for advance study, writing, and research.
  • Desire to learn more about and critically reflect upon democracy, leadership, organizations, and society, and
  • Are committed to the Center for Global Studies and Johnson’s mission of communicating throughout the world the message of peace and wholeness as described in the Scriptures.

Bachelor of Art in Democracy and Good Governance-Master of Arts in Global Leadership Studies uses asynchronous learning methods that require students to learn independently, but not alone. Additionally, our values-oriented educational perspective is based on an Africa leadership foundation and worldview, providing a substantive distinctive in this program.
The purpose of the Africa Studies Program via Master of Arts in Global Leadership is to provide training in Africa civilization, culture, history, literature, philosophy, and religion for individuals pursuing careers in a global setting.

Courses:

The online curriculum offers an innovative approach to higher education. Enrollment is open and students may begin the program at any time. All courses are provided in online, with on-to-one faculty mentoring whenever needed. Students also have free access to our comprehensive Resources Center of THINKWAVE, with links to subject and grades or other related web sites, online libraries.

Transcripts showing student progress are submitted after the mid-term exams and final Transcripts are submitted at the close of each semester.

Graduation

For graduation, a student must have at least a cumulative grade point average of 2.00.Graduation with honor will be determined according to the following standards:

Honor Cumulative Grade              Point Average
Cum Laude 3.57 – 3.69
Magna cum Laude 3.70 – 3.89
Summa cum Laude 3.90 – 4.00

 

GRADING GUIDELINE:

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

There are several written assignments for this Degree. There is a Considerable amount of writing involved in this degree, and we would prefer you to spend your time with the book learning the materials and practicing the self-study problems or your research papers at the end of each week on which the assignment is due. All weekly assignments are due on or before 12mid-night of the last Friday the assignment is due.  All Assignment must be submitted directly to the Professor’s email not the School’s email.

All Assigned Topic must be typed, double spaced. (At least 30 Pages with at least 25 references).

 

NO SKIPPING OF WEEKS… NO EXCEPTIONS

Length of Study:    96 WEEKS

WEEKS OF THE PROGRAM Completed Assignment  DATES GRADES
WEEK 1-4    
PHDL 7301            Leadership Through the Ages: Part One: Foundations Christianity and Non Christianity in Africa – West Africa-Theory Model
WEEK  5-8    
MAGL 5351    History and Culture of Africa  
WEEK  9-12    
PHDL 7302            Leadership Through the Ages: Part Two: Servant Leadership Model
WEEK 13-16    
MACE 6301    Introduction to Christian Education in Africa
WEEK  17-20    
PHDL 7303            Leadership Through the Ages: Part Three: Classical Leadership – Educational Model
WEEK  21-24    
MAGL 5352    History of Africa  Philosophy
WEEK  25-28    
MAGL 4598    Leadership in America And religion
WEEK  29-32    
PHDL 7304            Leadership Through the Ages: Part Four: Political Leadership – Power and Influence in Africa
WEEK 33-36    
MAGL 5354    Literature of Democracy in European Country
WEEK: 37-40    
TITLES OF ARTICLES:
  1. Good Governance for Sustainable Development – UN in West Africa
  2. Two Decades of Democracy and   Governance in Africa: Lessons Learned, Challenges and Prospects | CODESRIA
  3. Africa and the Challenges of Democracy and Good Governance in the 21st Century
  4. Globalization and development in sub-Saharan Africa by Jomo Kwame Sundaram with Oliver Schwank and Rudiger von Arnim
WEEK 41-44    
MAGL 5353    Fine Arts in West Africa
WEEK  45-48    
THEO 6305     Christian History and Heritage  in West Africa
WEEK  49-52    
PHDL 7305            Leadership Through the Ages: Part Five: Cultural and Global Leadership in West Africa
WEEK 53-56    
MAGL 5355    Leadership in Africa And religion
WEEK  57-60    
PHDL 7306            Organizational Christian and Non Christian Leadership
WEEK  61-64    
MAGL 5343    Understanding Islam  in Africa
WEEK  65-68    
MAGL 7354    Understanding Democracy from United Nations Perceptive (Leadership and Democracy in West Africa
WEEK  69-72    
PHDL 7307            Leadership for the Future in Africa
WEEK  73-76    
MAGL 5354    Literature of Africa
WEEK  77-80    
PHDL 7308            Readings Course: Great Books/Biographies of Some great Africa Leaders (Select Three Names and Summarize)
WEEK  81-84    
PHDB 7309            Special Topics in Business that influences Democracy
WEEK  85-92    
PHDL 7310  Mentored Leadership Internship-Recruitment of (6 Students to be enrolled)
WEEK  93-96    
MAGL 5354    Literature of America

NOTE: WEEK 85-92

PHDL 7310 COULD BE DONE AT ANYTIME OF THE PROGRAM.

The Master of Arts in Global Leadership program represents a new concept in graduate education. It is designed to meet the needs of mid-career leaders and to provide an innovative and highly flexible program allowing self-motivated students the opportunity to pursue  MA-PhD degree in the context of a learning community, without requiring a move of their families or a break in their careers,

 

  Master of Art in International Affairs: Global Governance, Politics, and Security

INTDRODUCTION

The Global Governance, Politics, and Security (GGPS) program gives West African students the professional skills and specialized training necessary to launch a career in global governance or global security. It takes a multidisciplinary approach to addressing the critical global issues of our time.

 

The program is offered at Covenant International University and Seminary-College of International Studies.

Our mission is to produce West African students with an understanding of global history and political and economic systems and the methodological tools and the practical skills to make sense of data and turn rigorous analysis into meaningful policy innovation and practical action to advance global governance and security.

 

The Covenant International University and Seminary-College of International Studies MA in Global Governance, Politics, and Security Studies provides a framework for you to analyze global military challenges, explore the intricacies of economic interdependence, and recognize the security implications of energy dependence and resource scarcity. Classes are designed to provide you with individual attention, encourage you to participate, and challenge you to analyze the international security environment.

 

As part of your studies, you’ll produce a thesis portfolio that showcases your ability to examine important political and policy questions. The thesis will help you hone your research skills, improve your analytical abilities, sharpen your communication style, and prep you to become a subject-matter expert. The program will also give you front-row access to vibrant speaker and symposia series, as well as a full calendar of events that reinforce critical themes in West African global security and encourage you to network with other professionals in your field—and outside the classroom.

 

Program Description

The global Master of Arts (MA) in International Affairs:  Global Governance, Politics, and Security enable students to analyze the complexities and processes involved in world politics and International affairs while traveling the world. Students achieve this objective not only through coursework providing exposure to the key subfields of the discipline and relevant issues such as globalization, human rights, humanitarian action, and economic development, but also through professional seminars and experiences at our College of International Studies  overseas sites.

Traveling in cohorts, students develop broad expertise in International relations while also earning a certificate in four specialized areas: Security Studies, International Development, Comparative and Regional Governance, or International Non-Governmental Organizations.

 

This program is ideal for students seeking work with a governmental agency, an intergovernmental organization, a nongovernmental organization, or a multi-national corporation. This program is also recommended to students planning to pursue a PhD or an academic career at another institution.

 

Global Degrees

Students enrolled in College of International Studies Global degrees achieve greater comprehension of theoretical approaches to understanding global issues, not only through traditional course work but also through lived experience in different nations, interaction with local people, and through field visits. Hence, there are several fundamental experiences that distinguish the “Global degree” from a “non-global” degree.

  • A Global degree can be completed at one  College of International Studies campus alone.
  • A Global degree includes study at several College of International Studies campuses in a minimum of three different countries.
  • A Global degree allows students to engage directly in various cultures and develop a global perspective that might not otherwise be achieved.
  • A Global degree requires a structured rotation of students among the College of International Studies campuses with a predefined academic curriculum for each campus.
  • A Global degree allows for the movement of a cohort of students between campuses while still achieving all of the requirements for graduation.
  • A Global degree is designed so that the time spent in the local culture at each College of International Studies campus complements the academic work in the student’s particular area of study.

Global degree programs have a cohort of students. They are not available for single students moving among campuses. The cohort size will be determined by the academic department offering the Global degree. The integration of location-specific highlights that enhance academic understanding is crucial to a Global degree and should be organized as a part of the student’s coursework, normally in professional seminars.

 

Degree Requirements

  • Capstone experience: demonstration of critical thinking, research and writing skills through completion of a master’s thesis, substantial research paper requirement, or practicum. All courses taken to fulfill this requirement must be passed with a grade of B or better.
  • Thesis: 12 credit hours of thesis credit and submission of the thesis
  • Substantial research paper requirement: 3 credit hours
  • Evidence of professional experience in the field: Relevant internship or work experience must be certified.
  • Proficiency in a modern foreign language: Research competence in English and another language relevant to the student’s career objectives must be certified.

 

Learning Outcomes

  • Students who complete this program will be able to :
  • Demonstrate working knowledge of several subfields of the discipline.
  • Demonstrate strong research skills.
  • Critically analyze International events and issues.
  • Apply theories of International relations.
  • Demonstrate effective written communication skills.
  • Develop the requisite skills to seek employment.

 

Admission Requirements

  • A completed Graduate Application for Admission, which can be completed and submitted online at http://cius-edu.com/apply.
    A $50 non-refundable application fee, which can be submitted online with the application for admission.
  • An official transcript showing conferral of a bachelor’s degree from a regionally accredited institution. Students who completed their university education outside the Africa must have earned a comparable recognized bachelor’s degree, as determined by College of International Studies University. Students who expect to earn their bachelor’s degree by July (the month prior to the start of the program) must submit an official transcript showing current academic progress.
  • A final degree-conferred transcript must be submitted for full admission. Applicants who have completed graduate-level work should also request an official graduate transcript to be mailed to the Office of Admission.
  • Students should have a minimum GPA of a 3.0 out of a 4.0 grading scale from their bachelor’s degree. Students with below this GPA may be considered for admission if they show successful academic achievement in their junior and senior years. This is considered on a case-by-case basis.
  • A current resume showing education, work, and volunteer experience.
  • An essay of 500-700 words in response to the following question: “What does it mean to be a global citizen?”
  • Two letters of recommendation which speak to the applicant’s motivation, character, and ability to be successful in an intensive, 11-month graduate program that requires significant travel.
  • One letter should come from a former or current professor/instructor. Recommendation letters should be written in narrative form and no more than one page in length. Applicants may submit recommendation letters with their application packet.
  • A phone interview may be required.

 

 

PROGRAM CURRICULUM DUE DATES GRADES
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS CLUSTER    
1ST QUATER
WEEK ——–1-2 JULY 17th , 2015
INTL 5000             INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
WEEK ——–3-4 JULY 31st  , 2015
INTL 5100             RESEARCH METHODS AND PERSPECTIVES -CORRECT THE WRONGS OF WEST AFRICAN  INTERNATIONAL RELATIONSL
WEEK ——–5-6 AUGUST 14th 2015
INTL 6000             CAPSTONE IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS – INTERVIEW OF A POLITICAL OFFICAAL
WEEK ——–7-8 AUGUST 28TH 2015
INTL 5500             PROFESSIONAL CAPSTONE-INTERVIEW OF A POLITICAL OFFICAL ON INTERNATIONAL SECURITY
WEEK ——–9-10 SEPTEMBER 11TH 2015
INTL 5555             POLICY AND PRACTICE: GLOBAL PROJECT IN INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS (2 HOURS)
COMPARATIVE POLITICS CLUSTER :  
WEEK ——–11-12 SEPTEMBER 25TH 2015
INTL 5050             COMPARATIVE POLITICS –NIGERIA, SOUTH AFRICA AND SIERRA LEONE
WEEK ——–13-14 OCTOBER 9TH 2015
INTL 5570             COMPARATIVE FOREIGN POLICY- WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES
WEEK ——–15-16 OCTOBER 23RD 2015
INTL 5580             POLITICS OF DEVELOPMENT IN WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES
WEEK ——–17-18 NOVEMBER 6TH 2015
INTL 5600  UNITED NATIONS VIEWS ON DIPLOMACY IN WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES
WEEK ——–19-20 NOVEMBER 20TTH 2016
INTL 5605             TOPICS IN COMPARATIVE POLITICS – WEST AFRICAN COUNTRIES
WEEK ——–21-22 DECEMBER 4TH 2015
INTL 5625             MIDDLE EAST AREA STUDIES –DEMOCRACRAY AND GLOBAL RELATIONS
WEEK ——–23-24 DECEMBER 18TH 2015
INTL 5635             WESTERN EUROPEAN AREA STUDIES –NATIONAL SECURITY
2ND QUATER
WEEK ——–25-26 JANURARY 1ST 2016
INTL 5645             ASIAN AREA STUDIES –UNITED NATIONS VIEW ON NATIONAL SECURITY
WEEK ——–27-28 JANURARY 15TH 2016
INTL 5655             AFRICAN AREA STUDIES- UNITED NATIONS VIEW ON NATIONAL SECURITY
WEEK ——–29-30 JANURARY 29TH 2016
INTL 5665             SOUTH AND CENTRAL ASIAN AREA STUDIES –GLOBAL SECURITY
WEEK ——–31-32 FEBRUARY 12TH 2016
INTL 5675             CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPEAN AREA STUDIES- NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTELLIGENCE
WEEK ——–33-34 FEBRUARY 26TH 2016
INTL 5685             LATIN AMERICAN AREA STUDIES  NATIONAL SECURITY AND INTELLIGENCE
GLOBAL SECURITY CLUSTER  
WEEK ——–35-36 MARCH 11TH 2016
HSM 544              INTRODUCTION TO HOMELAND SECURITY
WEEK ——–37-38 MARCH 25TH 2016
CST 604              TECHNOLOGY FOR HOMELAND SECURITY
WEEK ——–39-40 APRIL 8TH 2016
HSM 549              TERRORISM AND HOMELAND SECURITY
WEEK ——–41-42 APRIL 22ND 2016
INFO 719              INTRODUCTION TO GLOBAL SECURITY ENTERPRISE
WEEK ——–43-44 MAY 6TH 2016
CST 609                 GLOBAL  SECURITY INTELLIGENCE
WEEK ——–45-46 MAY 20TH 2016
CST 614               COUNTERINTELLIGENCE AS RELATES TO WEST AFRICA
WEEK ——–47-48 JUNE 3RD 2016
INFO 517              PRINCIPLES OF CYBERSECURITY
WEEK ——–49-50 JUNE 17TH 2016
3RD  QUATER
INFO 717              CYBER-COMPUTER CRIME LAW
WEEK ——–51-52 JULY 1ST 2016
INFO 718              CYBERSECURITY, LAW AND POLICY
WEEK ——–53-54 JULY 15TH 2016
HSM 644              PUBLIC MANAGEMENT IN CRISIS
WEEK ——–55-56 JULY 29TH 2016
HSM 645              EMERGENCY INCIDENT RISK MANAGEMENT
WEEK ——–57-58 AUGUST 12TH 2016
HSM 646              INFRASTRUCTURE DISASTER RECOVERY
INTERNATIONAL POLITICS CLUSTER  
WEEK ——–59-60 AUGUST 26TH 2016
INTL 5400             INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY
WEEK ——–61-62 SEPTEMBER 9TH 2016
INTL 5510             THEORIES OF INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
WEEK ——–63-64 SEPTEMBER 30TH 2016
INTL 5530             INTERNATIONAL LAW
WEEK ——–65-66 OCTOBER 7TH 2016
INTL 5535             INTERNATIONAL DISASTER RESPONSE LAW
WEEK ——–67-68 GRADUATE LAB
INTL 5540             INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AS RELATES TO WEST AFRICA
WEEK ——–69-70 OCTOBER 21ST 2016
INTL 5550             WAR AND DIPLOMACY
WEEK ——–71-72 NOVEMBER 4TH 2016
INTL 5560             U.S. FOREIGN POLICY
WEEK ——–73-74 NOVEMBER 18TH 2016
INTL 5590             INTERNATIONAL SECURITY –SIERRA LEONE
WEEK ——–75-76 DECEMBER 2ND 2016
INTL 5595             ENERGY SECURITY
WEEK ——–77-78 DECEMBER 16TH 2016
INTL 5700             HUMANITARIAN ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS
4TH  QUATER
WEEK ——–79-80 DECEMBER 30TH 2016
INTL 5800             GLOBALIZATION  IN WEST AFRICA
WEEK ——–81-82 JANURARY 13TH 2017
INTL 5860             ISSUES IN INTERNATIONAL POLITICS –SIERRA LEONE
WEEK ——–83-84 JANURARY 27TH 2017
INTL 5870             INTERNATIONAL LAW AND POLITICS OF OUTER SPACE
WEEK ——–85-86 FEBRUARY 10TH 2017
INTL 5890             TERRORISM IN WORLD POLITICS
WEEK ——–87-88 FEBRUARY 24TH 2017
HRTS 5000           INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RIGHTS
WEEK ——–89-90 MARCH 10TH 2017
INGO 5000          INTRODUCTION TO INTERNATIONAL NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS
WEEK ——–91-92 MARCH 24TH 2017
INGO 5600          PRINCIPLES OF NEGOTIATIONS
APPROVED ELECTIVES    
WEEK ——–93-94 APRIL 7TH 2017
INTB 5960            ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
WEEK ——–95-96 APRIL 21ST 2017
INGO 5900          PROJECT MANAGEMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL NONGOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS
WEEK ——–97-98 MAY 3RD 2017
INGO 5700          GRANT WRITING, FUNDRAISING, AND DEVELOPMENT FOR INTERNATIONAL NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS
WEEK ——–99-100 MAY 19TH 2017
INGO 6500          INTERNSHIP IN INTERNATIONAL NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS
WEEK ——–101-104 JUNE 2ND 2017
INTL 5300             FIELD WORK (3-6 HOURS)

AREAS OF STUDY AND CERTIFICATE OPTIONS

The Global Governance, Politics, and Security (GGPS) program focuses on four major areas of study. Students not wishing to complete the full master’s program may choose to take the courses from any of these areas as a standalone certificate program. Certificate credits may also be transferred into the master’s program prior to the awarding of the certificate.

  • Continuity Management
    Helps organizations and businesses prepare and cope with possible disruption of operations,  Whatever they may be.
  • Cyber security, Law & Policy
    Examines technical and policy issues under one umbrella while looking at issues of cybersecurity.
  • Homeland Security
    examines the evolution of Homeland Security as a concept, a legal framework and the redirection of GLOBAL policies to align with various threats.
  • Intelligence
    Introduces advanced theoretical and practical frameworks for the study of intelligence and its application in a wide variety of contexts, both foreign and domestic.

Locations

Students in the global International relations program typically visit the following countries:

  • Nigeria
  • Sierra Leone
  • Ghana
  • Liberia
  • Ivory Coast
  • Cuba
  • Austria
  • Kenya

 

Tracks

In addition to the Global MA Degree, each cohort is organized in an informal ‘track’ that focuses their studies on a particular area of International relations. Courses and locations are themed to this track to allow for specialization within the program. Completing the degree requirements for a particular cohort of the GMA program will also result in earning the Certificate for that track. The Tracks are:

  • Security Studies
  • International Development
  • Comparative and Regional Governance
  • International Non-Governmental Organizations

 

Courses:

The online curriculum offers an innovative approach to higher education. Enrollment is open and students may begin the program at any time. All courses are provided in online, with on-to-one faculty mentoring whenever needed. Students also have free access to our comprehensive Resources Center of THINKWAVE, with links to subject and grades or other related web sites, online libraries.

GRADING GUIDELINE:

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

There are several written assignments for this Degree. There is a Considerable amount of writing involved in this degree, and we would prefer you to spend your time with the book learning the materials and practicing the self-study problems or your research papers at the end of each week on which the assignment is due. All weekly or monthly assignments are due on or before 12mid-night of the last Friday the assignment is due.  All Assignment must be submitted directly to the Professor’s email not the School’s email.

All Assigned Topic must be typed, double spaced. (At least 30 Pages with at least 25 references).

 Transcripts showing student progress are submitted after the mid-term exams and final Transcripts are submitted at the close of each semester.

Graduation

For graduation, a student must have at least a cumulative grade point average of 2.00.Graduation with honor will be determined according to the following standards:

Honor  Cumulative Grade   Point Average

Cum Laude      3.57 – 3.69

Magna cum Laude      3.70 – 3.89

Summa cum Laude     3.90 – 4.00

CAREERS OPTIONS

  • Public Sector
    Commerce, Defense, Homeland Security, State, Treasury, FBI, CIA, DEA, and the GLOBAL Guard.
  • Private Sector
    Physical Security, Information Security, Personnel Security, Information Systems Security, Homeland Security, and Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP.)
  • Information Security Analyst
    The Bureau of Labor Statistics projects a 37% increase in this position in the coming years – much faster than the average for all other occupations

Master of Arts in Global Leadership

DESCRIPTION:

 Master of Arts in Global Leadership Studies is an online, research-based, interdisciplinary degree that seeks to facilitate the leadership abilities and roles of men and women working in inter-cultural, cross-cultural, and/or international contexts.

 A majority of students view this program as personal and professional development to enhance their current positions and roles within organizations and volunteer work. For some, this degree allows graduates to move into supervisory positions, become directors of programs, and achieve further credibility inside and outside of their organizations. An M.A. often opens the doors for teaching, consulting, and future graduate study.

The Master of Arts in Global Leadership is designed to prepare students to lead change initiatives in a globalizing world which is increasingly characterized by chaos, complexity, and change. Students learn to simultaneously search for the underlying causes of global environmental, economic and social problems, and at the same time learn how to design and lead responses that produce sustainable outcomes for the current and future generations.

Students in this program seek enhanced credentials or leadership positions within academic or ministry/political focused organizations. This program is flexibly designed for working adults who:

 

  • Have the intellectual capacity for advance study, writing, and research.
  • Desire to learn more about and critically reflect upon democracy, leadership, organizations, and society, and
  • Are committed to the Center for Global Studies and Johnson’s mission of communicating throughout the world the message of peace and wholeness as described in the Scriptures.

 Conducted completely online, Master of Arts in Global Leadership studies uses asynchronous learning methods that require students to learn independently, but not alone. Additionally, our values-oriented educational perspective is based on an Africa leadership foundation and worldview, providing a substantive distinctive in this program.

The Master of Arts in Global Leadership program represents a new concept in graduate education. It is designed to meet the needs of mid-career leaders and to provide an innovative and highly flexible program allowing self-motivated students the opportunity to pursue  MA degree in the context of a learning community, without requiring a move of their families or a break in their careers,

The purpose of the Master of Arts in Global Leadership is to provide training in Africa civilization, culture, history, literature, philosophy, and religion for individuals pursuing careers in a global setting.

  Courses:

The online curriculum offers an innovative approach to higher education. Enrollment is open and students may begin the program at any time. All courses are provided in online, with on-to-one faculty mentoring whenever needed. Students also have free access to our comprehensive Resources Center, with links to subject and grades or other related web sites, online libraries.

Transcripts showing student progress are submitted after the mid-term exams and final Transcripts are submitted at the close of each semester.

Graduation

For graduation, a student must have at least a cumulative grade point average of 2.00.Graduation with honor will be determined according to the following standards:

Honor Cumulative Grade   Point Average
Cum Laude 3.57 – 3.69
Magna cum Laude 3.70 – 3.89
Summa cum Laude 3.90 – 4.00

  GRADING GUIDELINE:

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

There are several written assignments for this Degree. There is a Considerable amount of writing involved in this degree, and we would prefer you to spend your time with the book learning the materials and practicing the self-study problems or your research papers at the end of each week on which the assignment is due. All monthly assignments are due on or before 12 mid-night of the last Friday the assignment is due.  All Assignment must be submitted directly to the Professor’s email not the School’s email.

 All Assigned Topic must be typed, double spaced. (At least 30 Pages with at least 25 references). Your schedule will be emailed to you once the university receives your first deposit. 

 

WEEKS OF THE PROGRAM Completed Assignment  DATES Grades
WEEK ——————1-9    
PHDL 7301            Leadership Through the Ages: Part One: Foundations Christianity and Non Christianity in Africa – West Africa-Theory Model
WEEK ——————10-18    
MAGL 5351    History and Culture of Africa  
WEEK ——————19-27    
PHDL 7302            Leadership Through the Ages: Part Two: Servant Leadership Model
WEEK ——————28-36    
MACE 6301    Introduction to Christian Education in Africa
WEEK ——————37-45    
PHDL 7303            Leadership Through the Ages: Part Three: Classical Leadership – Educational Model
WEEK ——————46-54    
MAGL 5352    History of Africa  Philosophy
WEEK ——————55-63    
MAGL 4598    Leadership in America And religion    
WEEK ——————64-72    
PHDL 7304            Leadership Through the Ages: Part Four: Political Leadership – Power and Influence in Africa
WEEK ——————73-81    
MAGL 5354    Literature of Democracy in European Country
WEEK ——————82-90    
MAGL 5353    Fine Arts in West Africa
WEEK ——————91-99    
THEO 6305     Christian History and Heritage  in West Africa
WEEK ——————100-108    
PHDL 7305            Leadership Through the Ages: Part Five: Cultural and Global Leadership in West Africa
WEEK ——————109-117    
MAGL 5355    Leadership in Africa And religion    
WEEK ——————118-126    
PHDL 7306            Organizational Christian and Non-Christian Leadership
WEEK ——————127-136    
MAGL 5343    Understanding Islam  in Africa
WEEK ——————137-146    
PHDL 7307            Leadership for the Future in Africa
WEEK ——————147-156    
MAGL 5354    Literature of Africa
WEEK ——————157-166    
PHDL 7308            Readings Course: Great Books/Biographies of Some great Africa Leaders (Select Three Names and Summarize)    
WEEK ——————167-176    
PHDB 7309            Special Topics in Business that influences Democracy
WEEK ——————177-186    
PHDL 7310  Mentored Leadership Internship-Recruitment of (6 Students to be enrolled)
WEEK ——————187-196    
MAGL 5354    Literature of America

NOTE: WEEK 85-92

PHDL 7310 COULD BE DONE AT ANYTIME OF THE PROGRAM..

 

 

 Master of Science in Telecommunication Systems Management

DESCRIPTION

The Master of Science in Telecommunication Systems Management degree is designed for professionals currently in the dynamic, exciting and thriving telecommunications industry who either wish to enhance their technical skills and credentials or who wish to make a transition to the business side of telecommunications. We also welcome applications from highly qualified prospective students with limited or no industry experience. This multi-disciplinary program, which may be pursued on a full- or part-time basis, gives students the flexibility to tailor the curriculum to their specific interests, backgrounds, and career goals

 

Master’s degree programs related to telecommunications management are offered online from both non-profit and for-profit colleges and universities. You can find related courses, programs and dual programs in schools of engineering, computing and business management. Online dual programs may offer both Master of Science and Master of Business Administration (MBA) programs. Virtual classes might be conducted via Web conferencing, chat rooms, online forums and e-mail.

 

The Telecommunications Systems Management curriculum provides a solid foundation in information systems technologies and the application of those technologies in a business environment.  Solid technical competency in IP infrastructure routing and switching, network services, network operating systems, network security, system security, and voice communication systems are provided in the core curriculum. Business courses in key areas of business principles provide a foundation for the graduate to intelligently apply technical skills to business problems.  Students select courses to extend this core into the areas of wireless systems, advanced security and system administration.

 

The award-winning Telecommunications Systems Management (COLLEGE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES) program was specifically designed to meet the demands of a rapidly evolving workplace where the information systems infrastructure is fundamental to the success of the enterprise.  This focus is constantly adjusted by a distinguished National Advisory Board to ensure that the curriculum is up-to-date.

 

Your coursework will vary depending on your area of focus. Degree programs that focus on computer science might include courses in cellular communications, Voice Over IP (VoIP), satellite communications, network management or wireless telecommunications systems. If your program focuses on electrical or computer engineering, you might study speech processing; electromagnetic, satellite or antenna systems; and microwave or digital satellite systems. Some schools offer concentrations in wireless, security, network applications, electronic commerce and project management.

 

You are pursuing a career in telecommunications, and now your big challenge is mapping out a professional direction. The Telecommunication Systems Management program can help you meet the challenge. The program is designed to help current and future telecom and networking professionals enhance their skills and credentials, deepen their telecommunications knowledge base, and/or extend their professional expertise to business management or marketing. One of only a very few programs nationwide to take a truly multidisciplinary approach to telecommunications and networking, this program combines resources from graduate programs in the College of Engineering, Computer and Information Science, and Business Administration. For students in the early stages of their telecom and networking career, Northeastern University’s renowned graduate co-op program allows students to work for six to eight months in the telecom industry as part of their program of study.

 

Learning Outcomes

  • Providing an advanced technical knowledge of applied telecommunications integrated with a solid grounding in business management techniques.
  • Developing critical management concepts such as the structure and environment of the telecommunications industry, strategic planning, financial management, and quality improvement.
  • Providing students with the skills to design networks establish or influence policy, make technology adoption and standards decisions.
  • Imparting professional knowledge in creating cost models for new technology implementations, calculating return on investment, and in the organizational and user implications of networking systems.
  • Enabling students to acquire mathematical modeling and design tools for telecommunications networks.
  • The ability to use basic engineering concepts flexibly in a variety of contexts.

Admissions

  1. What are the major factors considered in making an admission decision?
    The primary factor considered is the quality of the applicant’s undergraduate degree program, especially grades earned in relevant courses and overall grade as a percentage or as a GPA. (On the application, please submit the overall average grade as provided by your university, ie, do not convert your grade to an American-style GPA.) GRE-quantitative and TOEFL scores are also major contributing factors to admission decisions, as well as any prior experience in the telecommunication and networking industry. We also review letters of recommendation, the resume/C.V. and the statement of purpose as part of the review process.

DEGREE REQUIREMENTS

A minimum of 30 semester hours must be earned toward completion of the MSTSM degree. A minimum grade-point average of 3.000 is required over all courses applied toward the degree. To qualify for any degree from the Graduate College of International Studies, a student must attain a cumulative grade-point average (GPA) of 3.000 or higher with no more than 8 semester hours below the grade of B– in all courses applied toward that degree, exclusive of any prerequisite courses. However, prerequisite courses are calculated into GPA.

The committee on graduate study in College of International Studies allows students to take 8 semester hours of credit beyond stated minimum degree requirements for the purpose of repeating failed required courses or substituting for elective courses in order to attain the required 3.000 GPA for the completion of degree requirements. Within the above limitations for extra or repeated courses, a student must repeat any required course in which he or she earns a grade of C+ or less and earn a grade of B– or better..

 

OVERVIEW

The business aspect of telecommunication management developed in a society dominated by new services supported on Information Technology and Telecommunications, demands companies, organizations, institutions and everyday activities connected through telecommunication networks.

The understanding of new developments in the field of Telecommunications will allow the business manager of the XXI century to be able to issue organizational, technological, commercial and financial innovations, to ensure optimal levels of competitiveness for their organizations in the new overall interconnected market.

 

The Master’s program in Strategic Management in Telecommunications (MSMTel), addresses the need for a comprehensive understanding of the various technological possibilities of current and future networks. It provides special attention to the different services that provide network and telecommunications, and the new business opportunities that they offer to businesses. With this vision, the program provides the foundation for business innovation based on sound management and aligning organizational strategies with the strategies of Telecommunications.

 

The Master of Science in Telecommunication Systems Management degree is designed for West African professionals currently in the telecommunications or networking field who either wish to enhance their technical skills and credentials or who wish to make a transition to the business side of telecommunications or networking. We also welcome applications from prospective students with limited industry experience. This program, which may be pursued on a full- or part-time basis, is one of only a very few master’s programs in telecommunications system management in the West Africa that is truly multidisciplinary, giving students the flexibility to tailor the curriculum to their specific interests, backgrounds, and career goals. MSTSM—Master of Science in Telecommunication Systems Management

 

Importance of graduate training in Strategic Management and IT

Uniting the broad field of management with the theoretical body and applied knowledge of Business Strategy with an overall vision of society, and a strong analysis of the role of telecommunications in the strategic processes of organizations in the new economy, demands a proper solid graduate training to:

  • Give a broad view of the relationship between society and Telecommunications.
  • Give a complete overview of strategic thinking from business planning through the deployment of Telecommunication strategies.
  • Comprehend the intimate relationship between business processes, organizational systems and ways of working with the world of Telecommunications (emphasizing networks and telecommunication services and the Internet).
  • Provide theoretical knowledge about Telecommunications related to tools and methods in use, and international experiences with strategic direction.
  • Skills to overcome the specific and singular problems of all the activities related to the processes of organizational change resulting from the implementation of Telecommunications.

 

 

 

REQUIRED REQUIREMENTS* DUE DATES GRADES
WEEK 1-3
TELE 5310 Fundamentals of Communication Systems
WEEK 4-6
TELE 5320 Telecommunications Architecture and Systems
WEEK 7-9
TELE 5330 Data Networking
WEEK 10-12
TELE 5340 Telecommunications Public Policy and Business Management
WEEK 13-15
HRMG 6210 Managing Professionals and High Performance Teams
WEEK 16-18
INFO 6245 Planning and Managing Information Systems Development
WEEK 19-21
INFO 7285 Organizational Change and IT
WEEK 22-24
MGSC 6206 Management of Service and
WEEK 25-27
MTIO         3981 Manufacturing Operations
WEEK 28-30
MKTG 6200 Creating and Sustaining Customer Markets
WEEK 31-33
MKTG 6208 Marketing and Customer Value
WEEK 34-36
MKTG 6214 New Product Development
WEEK 37-39
TECE 6200 Innovation and Entrepreneurial Growth
WEEK 40-42
TECE 6250 Lean Design and Development
WEEK 43-45
TELE 6370 Perspectives in Telecommunications Policy
WEEK 46-48
TELE 6380 Consulting Project in Telecommunications
WEEK 49-51
CS 5500 Managing Software Development
WEEK52-54
CS 5010 Programming Design Paradigm
WEEK55-57
CS 5520 Mobile Application Development
WEEK58-60
CS 5700 Fundamentals of Computer Networking
WEEK61-63
CS 6520 Methods of Software Development
WEEK64-66
CS 6710 Wireless Network 67-69
WEEK ——–70-72
CS 7756 Network Security
WEEK ——–73-75
EECE 5576 Wireless Communication Systems
WEEK ——–76-78
EECE 7364 Mobile and Wireless Networking
WEEK ——–79-81
EECE 7374 Fundamentals of Computer Networks
WEEK ——–82-84
IA 5150 Network Security Practices
WEEK ——–85-87
INFO 6210 Data Management and Database Design
WEEK ——–88-90
TELE 5600 Linux/UNIX Systems Management for Network Engineers
WEEK ——–91-93
ELEC 6311 Broadband Networking: Services and Technology
WEEK ——–94-96
ELEC 6312 Telecommunications Auditing
WEEK ——–97-99
ELEC 6411 Nanotechnology
WEEK ——–100-102
MSc Telecommunications Management
WEEK ——–103-104
ELEC 6105 Principles of Applied Telecommunications
EMD PF ALL ASSIGNMENTS ——————————-  
SELF-STUY/GRADIATE LAB SELF-STUY/GRADIATE LAB  
ELEC 6313 Marketing in Telecommunications SELF-STUY/GRADIATE LAB
ELEC 6314 Network Security and Forensics SELF-STUY/GRADIATE LAB
TELE 6100 Telecommunications Convergence SELF-STUY/GRADIATE LAB

* A grade of C or higher is required:

 

Central concepts of the program: Strategic Management and Telecommunications

While strategic management leads to the understanding of the proper management of a company, and Telecommunications leads to the understanding of potential networks, when joining the first to the second, a space appears where Business Administration with Telecommunication Management coexist. This new space allows two things:

  • Understanding Strategic Management aligned with ICT and Telecommunications. In this case there is a better understanding of the new forms of corporate management that arises due to the presence of network and telecommunication services.
  • Applying Strategic Management in network management and telecommunication services. In this case, we obtain an entrepreneurial view of Telecommunications when they are considered a strategic resource and a base of many new businesses.

 

Graduates of the COLLEGE OF INTERNATIONAL STUDIES program are employed throughout the United States in a wide variety of industries including manufacturing, insurance, banking, healthcare, education, internet & phone service provider, and government.  Typical job titles include:

  • Network Security Specialist
  • Telecommunications Project Manager
  • Network Analyst & Designer
  • Data Network Supervisor
  • LAN/WAN Support Specialist
  • Systems Security Administrator
  • Computer Network Manager

Assessment

Each module will carry 100 marks and will be assessed as follows (unless otherwise specified):

Written examination of 3-hour duration and continuous assessment of 20% to 30% of total marks.

Continuous assessment can be based on laboratory work, assignments and/or 1 class test.

An overall of 50% for combined Continuous Assessment and Written Examination components

Would be required to pass the module.

 

Courses:

The online curriculum offers an innovative approach to higher education. Enrollment is open and students may begin the program at any time. All courses are provided in online, with on-to-one faculty mentoring whenever needed. Students also have free access to our comprehensive Resources Center of THINKWAVE, with links to subject and grades or other related web sites, online libraries.

 

GRADING GUIDELINE:

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

There are several written assignments for this Degree. There is a Considerable amount of writing involved in this degree, and we would prefer you to spend your time with the book learning the materials and practicing the self-study problems or your research papers at the end of each week on which the assignment is due. All weekly or monthly assignments are due on or before 12mid-night of the last Friday the assignment is due.  All Assignment must be submitted directly to the Professor’s email not the School’s email.

 

All Assigned Topic must be typed, double spaced. (At least 30 Pages with at least 25 references).

 

 

Transcripts showing student progress are submitted after the mid-term exams and final Transcripts are submitted at the close of each semester.

 

Graduation

For graduation, a student must have at least a cumulative grade point average of 2.00.Graduation with honor will be determined according to the following standards:

Honor  Cumulative Grade   Point Average

Cum Laude      3.57 – 3.69

Magna cum Laude      3.70 – 3.89

Summa cum Laude     3.90 – 4.00

 

Master in Business Administration (MBA),

 Finance Specialization

Start Date:  2015

End Date: 2017

Durations of Study: 2 years

Introduction:

Covenant International University and Seminary- College of International Studies Master in Business Administration MBA specialization in finance provides you with a solid foundation in money management and an understanding of public and private fiduciary processes in a world where finance is an international language. The courses within this specialization are designed to help you understand the fundamentals of banking, financial statement analysis, corporate and international finance. Graduates will navigate through a variety situations and problem solve with a global perspective.

 

Individuals with knowledge in finance will have the opportunity to differentiate themselves from peers and build life-long skills while positively impacting the business world. An extensive knowledge of finance can be the difference-maker for a successful business.

 

MBA in Finance

In only few months, the MBA in Finance at Covenant International University and Seminary- College of International Studies will deliver a leading-edge curriculum balanced between finance and asset/portfolio management. You’ll be prepared for a range of career opportunities, including corporate finance, risk management, money management, financial planning, investment banking, consulting, or real estate.

 

The MBA-FIN is one of the few advanced finance degrees offered by a top-ranked business school, offering a distinctive foundation in business and finance. You’ll have access to world-renowned faculty, motivated classmates, and personalized career resources.

 

Course overview

This Master in Business Administration (MBA) has a particular focus on finance, giving you a fast track towards senior roles with major financial responsibility. More broadly, the course aims to accelerate your promotion and open up new opportunities. You will develop a deep strategic understanding of the different functions within organizations. You will also learn how to re-apply the best of international management practices and how to implement approaches that deliver outstanding results. In addition to the core elements completed by all our MBA students, you will complete the specialist module ‘Management, Accounting and Control’. You will also undertake a dissertation related to finance.

 

This course provides a framework for analyzing financial management and investment decisions. Practical tools for financial decisions and valuation are studied. There are seven main sections to the course, whose content ranges from foundational principles to tactical and strategic issues: (1) Cost of Capital Estimation, in which project expected returns are estimated; (2) Capital Budgeting, in which optimal criteria for project selection are applied; (3) Techniques of Valuation, which includes weighted average cost of capital (WACC), adjusted present value (APV), comparable trades, real options, and venture capital (VC) method; (4) Financing Policy, in which theoretical and practical issues relating to capital structure and dividend policies are analyzed and discussed; (5) Tactical Financing Decisions, including lease financing and the funding with hybrid  instruments; (6) Investment Banking, covering capital acquisition, IPOs, financial restructuring, and mergers & acquisitions; and (7) Risk Management, dealing with the use of swaps and futures. The challenges and opportunities arising from international linkages and continual innovation in financial products and practice are taken into consideration throughout the course.

 

Course Aims & Objectives

By the end of this course at Covenant International University and Seminary- College of International Studies , the student will be able to:

  • Estimate cash flows, risk, required returns, and value of capital projects;
  • Discuss the effect of inflation volatility, exchange rate volatility, and lack of liquidity on cash
  • flow projections, terminal value, and liquidation value for projects in emerging markets;
  • Describe the essential elements of the Capital Asset Pricing Model (CAPM), and the
  • Arbitrage Pricing Theory (APT) along with their approach to modeling the price of risk;
  • Discuss why and how asset pricing models should be modified for application to emerging
  • Countries;
  • Estimate the equity risk premium and discuss its role in the determination of required returns;
  • Apply the net present value (NPV), internal rate of return (IRR) and adjusted present value (APV) method of investment valuation;
  • Use basic options analysis to incorporate into the project valuation process the flexibility of investing in stages or having the option to abandon, and discuss the particular need of building in this flexibility for more volatile economies;
  • Calculate free cash flows to the firm and the weighted average cost of capital, based on relevant financial statement and market information;
  • Discuss the rationale for mergers, and the chief methods of valuing an acquisition target company;

 Assessment

Your grade will be based on your performance in class participation (15%), homework (10%),

two case assignments (10%), a project (10%), a mid-term exam (20%), and a final exam

(35%). The homework and case assignments are to be done by groups of approximately four

to five students.

Class Participation

Simply attending the class online oar on campus is not enough to get a favorable class participation grade. In evaluating class participation, I will look for comments that are thoughtful and lead the discussion forward. You can improve your participation grade considerably by coming to class prepared. In grading for class participation, I will also take into account your active participation in the forum on IVLE.

Homework

You will be asked to do a series of homework assignments. At the end of the term I will grade only two randomly selected assignments. Failure to turn in an assignment (even one which is not eventually graded) by the deadline will result in a penalty.

Cases

Each group will have to submit a case memorandum for the two cases that we will discuss in class. The case memorandum should be a maximum of two pages (typed and double-spaced) for the write-up and a maximum of three pages for any supporting tables/graphs/exhibits. More details on the case assignment will be provided in a separate document.

Project

Each group will do a project on estimating the cost of capital of a real-life firm. More details on the project will be provided in a separate document.

Exams

The exam format will likely be a combination of multiple-choice questions, fill-in-the-blanks, long problems, and essay-type questions. These questions will be designed to test your analytical and problem solving skills, and your knowledge of conceptual and qualitative material. The final exam will be cumulative but will emphasize topics covered after the midterm exam. If, for some valid reason, you are unable to take the mid-term exam on the scheduled date, then the weighting of the grade on the mid-term exam will be transferred to the final exam. Students must take the final exam to get a passing grade for this module.

 

Course content Assignment Due Dates Grades
WEEK 1-3 JULY 24TH 2015
FINC 6031  Investment Analysis and Management of Finance
WEEK 4 – 6 AUGUST 15TH 2015
ACCT-607 Financial Accounting Method in West Africa
WEEK 7-9 SEPTEMBER 4TH 2015
FINC  4561 Management Accounting and Control
WEEK 10-12 SEPTEMBER 25TH 2015
FINC 9081 Business Communications  Skills
WEEK 13-15 OCTOBER 16TH 2015
FINC  8613 Strategic Decision Making  in Finance
WEEK 16-18 NOVEMBER 6TH 2015
FINC -614 Financial Management  in Sierra Leone
WEEK 19-21 NOVEMBER 27TH 2015
CBUS-618 Manager in the International Economy
WEEK 22-24 DECEMBER 18TH 2015
CTEC-610 Applied Managerial Statistics   in Finance
WEEK 25-27 JANURARY 15TH 2016
FINC  5606 International Financial Markets in West Africa
WEEK 28-30 FEBRUARY 5TH 2016
FINC:6408 Portfolio Management
WEEK 31-33 FEBRURARY 26TH 2016
FINC  6109 Options/Derivatives in Finance
WEEK 34-36 MARCH 18TH 2016
FINC 6611 Analysis of Fixed Income Securities
WEEK 37-39 APRIL 15TH 2016
ITEC-617 Information and Technology  in Finance
WEEK 40-42 MAY 6TH 2016
CTEC-618 Applied Production and Operations Management in Finance
WEEK 43-45 MAY 27TH 2016
FINC -9609 Business at the Private-Public Intersection
WEEK 46-48 JUNE 17TH 2016
CKSB-653 Business Leadership and Skills Workshop
WEEK 49-51 JULY 8TH 2016
MGMT-609 Management of Organizations and Human Capital
WEEK 52-54 JULY 29TH 2016
MKTG-612 Marketing Management in Finance
WEEK 55-57 AUGUST 19TH 2016
FINC:6041 Financial Institutions and Markets
WEEK 58-60 SEPTEMBER 16TH 2016
FINC 6015 Advanced Financial Management/Corporate Finance
WEEK 61-63 NOVEMBER  7TH 2016
FINC  6781 Managing Innovation and Technology Transfer in Finance
WEEK 64-66 NOVEMBER 28TH 2016
FINC 6148 Decoding of Corporate Financial Communications
WEEK 67-69 OCTOBER 18TH 2016
FINC 5571 Survey of Financial Theory Methods
WEEK 70-72 DECEMBER 9TH 2016
FINC 5572 Survey of Financial Theory in West Africa
WEEK 73-75 DECEMBER 30TH 2016
FINC 6601 Risk and Insurance Management
WEEK 76-78 JANURARY 20TH 2017
FINC 4612 Small Business Finance
WEEK 79-81 FEBRUARY 10TH 2017
FINC 7613 Financial Statement Analysis  in Banking System
WEEK 82-84 MARCH 3RD 2017
FINC 7660 Analysis of Financial Markets and Institutions
WEEK 85-87 MARCH 24TH 2017
FINC 7661 Corporate Finance in Wall street
WEEK 88-90 APRIL 14TH 2016
FINC 7662 Investment Analysis and Portfolio Theory in Finance
WEEK 91-93 MAY 5TH 2017
FINC  9000  Financial Management and Control
WEEK 94-96 MAY 26TH 2017
FINC 9001 Managing and Leading People
WEEK 97-98 JUNE 9TH 2017
FINC  9002 Operations  Management in West African Banking System
WEEK 99-100 JUNE 23RD
FINC  9004  Marketing Management in America
WEEK 101-102 JULY 7TH 2017
FINC  9006  International Business Environment
WEEK 103-104 JULY 21ST 2017
FINC   9008 Global Corporate Strategy

 

Teaching and assessment

We use a wide variety of teaching and learning methods that include lectures, seminars, class discussions, case studies, group work, presentations and applied study. Assessment is mainly through the dissertation and assignments, as well as exams in some subjects.

Information about our policies relating to student experience and quality assurance processes will be given by the professor teaching the class.

 

Employment & careers

The applied nature of our MBA course will build on your previous managerial experience while moving you forward on a journey of practical professional development. The course is an investment in yourself that can lead to:

  • Higher salary
  • Promotion opportunities
  • Greater employability
  • Flexibility in an evolving job market

The most common reason for undertaking an MBA is to improve job opportunities. Students who graduate from Covenant International University and Seminary- College of International Studies MBA graduate program can find work in roles such as:

  • Financial Controller in the Gulf region
  • Financial Analyst for ultra-high net worth investors
  • Operations Director in an oil company
  • Management Consultant with an international consultancy group
  • General Manager in Eastern Europe
  • Division Chief in China
  • Business Development Manager for an automotive supplier
  • Vice President of a Canadian corporation

Courses:

The online curriculum offers an innovative approach to higher education. Enrollment is open and students may begin the program at any time. All courses are provided in online, with on-to-one faculty mentoring whenever needed. Students also have free access to our comprehensive Resources Center of THINKWAVE, with links to subject and grades or other related web sites, online libraries.

 

GRADING GUIDELINE:

 

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

There are several written assignments for this Degree. There is a Considerable amount of writing involved in this degree, and we would prefer you to spend your time with the book learning the materials and practicing the self-study problems or your research papers at the end of each week on which the assignment is due. All weekly or monthly assignments are due on or before 12mid-night of the last Friday the assignment is due.  All Assignment must be submitted directly to the Professor’s email not the School’s email.

All Assigned Topic must be typed, double spaced. (At least 30 Pages with at least 25 references).

 

Transcripts showing student progress are submitted after the mid-term exams and final Transcripts are submitted at the close of each semester.

 

Graduation

For graduation, a student must have at least a cumulative grade point average of 2.00.Graduation with honor will be determined according to the following standards:

Honor  Cumulative Grade   Point Average

Cum Laude      3.57 – 3.69

Magna cum Laude      3.70 – 3.89

Summa cum Laude     3.90 – 4.00

 Master of Arts in Diplomacy and International Relations

Introduction:

Master of Arts in Diplomacy and International Relations at Covenant International University and Seminary-College of International Studies is designed to introduce students to theoretical and practical approaches to the study of international Diplomacy through the study of a core module in Contemporary Diplomacy and to encourage interdisciplinary scholarship. In particular this degree program encourages the ability to delineate and evaluate issues, select relevant materials and produce arguments encompassing policy, existing practice and knowledge at an advanced level in Diplomacy and the international relations of States.

 

The graduate curriculum combines interdisciplinary global studies with research methodology and policy analysis, culminating in a professional internship and a research project. To attain the M.A. degree in Diplomacy and International Relations, students complete a total of more than 55 credit hours, satisfying core curriculum requirements and concentrating in two fields of specialization. Specializations offer students the opportunity to structure their academic studies according to their particular interests, career goals and background.

Among the functional specializations offered are international economics and development, international organizations, international law and human rights, negotiation and conflict management, global health and human security, foreign policy analysis, international security, and post-conflict state reconstruction and sustainability. Regional specializations include Africa, Asia, Europe, Latin America and the Caribbean, and the Middle East.  At the College of International Studies, we encourage students to specialize in European or Africa studies.

 

At the College of International Studies, graduate students of diverse cultural, educational and professional backgrounds form an international academic community. The graduate program fosters leadership and civic responsibility, while sharpening analytical and practical skills. Small classes create a supportive environment that encourages mentoring relationships. An active graduate student association engages in a variety of projects and activities.

 

Graduate assistantships, research assistantships and positions on the student-edited Journal of Diplomacy and International Relations are awarded on a competitive basis. The College of International Studies participates in several e dual degree programs designed to prepare students to bring Diplomacy to the professions of business, law, communications and nonprofit management, and to specialize in Europe, West African  and Asian studies. .. It seeks also to develop those practical, generic and personal transferable skills necessary to conduct independent research.

 

Program Outcomes

KNOWLEDGE AND  UNDERSTANDING.

 Knowledge and understanding of:

1) Key issues in Diplomacy including issues of politics, law and economics and the process of

Interdisciplinary analysis of international issues;

2) A range of research methodologies sufficient to formulate appropriate and relevant research questions and conduct independent research in Diplomatic methodologies and techniques;

3) A select range of options to broaden understanding of the operation of Diplomatic relations at

an advanced level;

Teaching/learning methods and strategies:

  • The basic knowledge in all modules is provided by seminars; although some modules may be include lectures. All seminars allow a student to gauge his/her progress in that module and will require significant student input into the acquisition and dissemination of knowledge. The critical input into learning is provided by a student’s own reading and preparation for group discussions (particularly engagement with primary sources).

Assessment

  • Modules adopt a variety of assessment methods but all modules utilize either summative assessed work or an end of year unseen, timed exam. The majority of modules utilize a combination of both methods of assessment.
  • Skills And Other Attributes Skills And Other Attributes

 

  1. Intellectual skills – able to:

1) Think logically;

2) Analyze and problems and issues;

3) Discriminate between relevant and irrelevant material;

4) Understand technical material;

5) Apply relevant knowledge effectively; and

6) Construct defensible arguments and exercise critical judgment.

  • Teaching/learning methods and strategies
  • Logic, analytical skill and the ability to apply relevant knowledge is inherent in the study of law and politics
  • and these skills are encouraged and developed in seminars.
  • Assessment
  • Both formal examinations and summative assessed work assess all these skills either directly or indirectly.

 

  1. Practical skills – able to:
  • Discover and use political, legal and/or economics and contextual materials from a variety of sources; and
  • Evaluate political, legal and/or economic and contextual material both individually and a part of a team;
  • Construct and present (orally and in writing) defensible arguments and exercise critical judgment.

Teaching/learning methods and strategies

  • All the practical skills are present in each module and are developed through seminars. The essence of Diplomacy is to provide an answer to a practical problems having identified the issues, selected relevant facts and used appropriate analysis to provide a solution. The encouragement of these faculties is inherent in all parts of the degree. All modules seek to develop powers of critical analysis and judgment.

Assessment

  • The written element of 3 is directly assessed through summative assessed work and/or formal examinations (examinations indirectly assess 1 and 2). The dissertation requires elements of 2 and 3. Some modules assess oral communication (formatively or summatively).
  1. Transferable skills – able to:
  2. Work independently and hard;
  3. Use different types of information sources;
  4. Communicate technical material effectively both orally and in writing; and
  5. Construct defensible arguments and exercise critical judgment;
  6. Reflect critically on one’s own learning;
  7. Consider career development.

Teaching/learning methods and strategies

  • Diplomacy is a subject of considerable complexity; some material is difficult and not all of it is of overpowering interest; a student must work hard to engage with such material. A student will be required regularly to participate in class discussions and make presentations. He or she will be required to engage with a considerable amount of academic and other literature and to assess and evaluate such literature critically and in the context of presenting advanced arguments both orally and in writing.

Assessment

  • Both formal examinations and summative assessed work assess all these skills (oral skills are assessed in at least one module) other than 5 and 6. Seminars encourage a student to reflect on his or her own learning. Guidance is given throughout the degree program on career development.
Required Assignments DUE DATES  
General requirements: all students must successfully complete:    
CIRDL 6000 International Relations Theory
CIRDL 6310 Research Methods for Policy Analysis
CIRDL 6311 Master’s Research Project
CIRDL 7111 Internship
CIRDL 6001 Politics of Cultural and Ethnic Pluralism
CIRDL 6002 International Organizations
CIRDL 6005 Public International Law
CIRDL 6104 Art and Science of International Negotiation
Functional Specializations Foreign Policy Analysis    
CIRDL 6180 Comparative Foreign Policy*
CIRDL 6119 New Approaches to Managing the Evolving Conflict Environment
CIRDL 6181 Statecraft: Designing Foreign Policy
CIRDL 6182 U.S. Foreign Policy
CIRDL 6190 Seminar in Foreign Policy Analysis
CIRDL 6195 Creating a 21st Century Diplomacy
CIRDL 6196 Talking with the Enemy
CIRDL 6197 U.S. Policy on Stabilization and Reconstruction in Fragile States
CIRDL 6198 Human Rights in U.S. Foreign Policy
CIRDL 6403 European Union: External Relations
CIRDL 6405 Foreign Policy of Post-Soviet Politics
CIRDL 6409 Small State Diplomacy Portugal’s Role in International Affairs
CIRDL 6501 The Modern Middle East: U.S. Involvement
CIRDL 6610 China’s Rise: Opportunities and
CIRDL 6611 International Relations of Southeast Asia
CIRDL 6622 China’s Foreign Relations
CIRDL 6700 International Relations of African States
CIRDL 6703 American Foreign Policy in Africa
CIRDL 6801 U.S. Foreign Policy in Latin America and the Caribbean Global Health and Human Security
CIRDL 6277 Global Health, Bioterrorism, and International Security *
CIRDL 6004 Peacemaking and Peacekeeping
CIRDL 6031 International Environmental Policy
CIRDL 6129 Preventing Humanitarian Crisis
CIRDL 6130 International Security
CIRDL 6278 Global Health Diplomacy
CIRDL 6279 Contagion and Conflict: Global Impact of Infectious Disease
CIRDL 6280 International Health and Development
Global Negotiation and Conflict Management
CIRDL 6104 Art and Science of International Negotiation *
CIRDL 6004 Peacemaking and Peacekeeping
CIRDL 6114 Conflict Prevention
CIRDL 6115 Cross-Cultural Negotiation and Conflict Management
CIRDL 6116 Palestinian-Israeli Peace Process
CIRDL 6117 International Mediation
CIRDL 6118 Global Conflict Resolution and Peace building
CIRDL 6119 New Approaches to Managing the Evolving Conflict Environment
CIRDL 6120 Catholic Peacemaking
CIRDL 6134 Nuclear Weapons in International Relations
CIRDL 6195 Creating a 21st Century Diplomacy
CIRDL 6196 Talking with the Enemy
CIRDL 6197 U.S. Policy on Stabilization and Reconstruction in Fragile States
CIRDL 6250 Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Plural Societies
CIRDL 6251 Justice, Truth and Reconciliation in Post-Conflict Societies
CIRDL 6277 Global Health, Bioterrorism, and International Security
CIRDL 6278 Global Health Diplomacy
CIRDL 6610 China’s Rise: Opportunities and Challenges
CIRDL 6622 China’s Foreign Relations
West  Africa and Europe Specializations    
CIRDL 6401 European Union: Development and Dynamics
CIRDL 6402 European Union: Governance and Policy
CIRDL 6403 European Union: External Relations
CIRDL 6405 West African Foreign policy of Post-Soviet States
CIRDL 6406 Eastern Europe and Post-Soviet Politics
CIRDL 6409 Small State Diplomacy: Portugal’s Role in International Affairs
CIRDL 6410 European Union Seminar in Luxembourg
CIRDL 6422 Trans-Atlantic Relations and World Politics
CIRDL  6153 Comparative Political Economy Development (West African and European Union
CIRDL 6170 Advanced Topics in Economic Development for International Affairs

**B.S./M.A.  Dual degree

**B.S./M.A.  Dual degree candidates who have completed CIRDL 2120 with a grade of B+ or better have fulfilled the foundation course requirement for the International Security specialization and should take three other courses from the specialization.

 

Post-Conflict State Reconstruction and Sustainability

CIRDL 6004 Peacemaking and Peacekeeping

CIRDL 6119 New Approaches to Managing the Evolving Conflict Environment

CIRDL 6120 Catholic Peacemaking

CIRDL 6121 Catholic Peacemaking Intensive Study Seminar

CIRDL 6250 Conflict and Conflict Resolution in Plural Societies

CIRDL 6251 Justice, Truth and Reconciliation in Post-Conflict Societies

CIRDL 6252 Institutions of Post-Conflict Governance

CIRDL 6253 Civil Conflict and Development

CIRDL 6408 Kosovo Study Seminar

 

 Specializations (18 credits)

Students must select two specializations and take a minimum of three courses for each specialization. Courses

Taken in one specialization may not be counted toward another specialization or to meet any other requirements. Other courses may qualify for specializations by permission of the specialization head and the Associate Deans. Certain Specializations require a foundation course where indicated by an asterisk *. Students are required to declare their Specialization in their final semester so that the specialization can appear on their official University transcript.

 

Course Outline

Master of Art in Diplomacy and International Relations candidates are required to complete the two primary core modules:

  • Contemporary International Relations and Diplomacy (30 credits)
  • Dissertation (60 credits)

In addition, students choose optional modules totaling 90 credits [which can include up to 30 credits of research training*], from a list of optional modules some of which are listed below:

  • Conflict & Conflict Resolution (30 credits)
  • International Relations (30 credits)
  • International Security Studies (30 credits)
  • International Political Economy (30 credits)
  • The United Nations, Humanitarian Intervention and Contemporary Warfare (30 credits)
  • The Practice of Strategy in History (30 credits)
  • Strategic Theory (30 credits)
  • Modern Strategy (30 credits)
  • The Origins and Causes of War (30 credits)
  • Conflict in the Middle East (30 credits)
  • Terrorism in a Globalizing World (30 credits)
  • Cold War Culture (30 credits)
  • Philosophical issues in the Social Sciences (20 credits)
  • Introduction to Research Methods in Politics and International Relations (20 credits)
  • Advanced Research Methods in Politics and International Relations (20 credits)
  • Full course descriptions can be found at the end of this document.

Courses:

The online curriculum offers an innovative approach to higher education. Enrollment is open and students may begin the program at any time. All courses are provided in online, with on-to-one faculty mentoring whenever needed. Students also have free access to our comprehensive Resources Center of THINKWAVE, with links to subject and grades or other related web sites, online libraries.

GRADING GUIDELINE:

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

There are several written assignments for this Degree. There is a Considerable amount of writing involved in this degree, and we would prefer you to spend your time with the book learning the materials and practicing the self-study problems or your research papers at the end of each week on which the assignment is due. All weekly or monthly assignments are due on or before 12mid-night of the last Friday the assignment is due.  All Assignment must be submitted directly to the Professor’s email not the School’s email.

 

All Assigned Topic must be typed, double spaced. (At least 30 Pages with at least 25 references).

 

Transcripts showing student progress are submitted after the mid-term exams and final Transcripts are submitted at the close of each semester.

 

Graduation

For graduation, a student must have at least a cumulative grade point average of 2.00.Graduation with honor will be determined according to the following standards:

Honor  Cumulative Grade   Point Average

Cum Laude      3.57 – 3.69

Magna cum Laude      3.70 – 3.89

Summa cum Laude     3.90 – 4.00

 

  Doctor of Philosophy in Hotel Management

 

DESCRIPTION:

The doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in Hotel Management (HM) is an advanced graduate program designed for individuals who wish to become Hotel researchers and professors at the university level.

Students’ programs are individualized to ensure that, in addition to a mastery of the scope of knowledge in a respective area, students also have the ability to complete significant conceptual research.

The Hotel Management Program at the Covenant International University is committed to providing cutting edge, quality education for our diverse student population. We provide a winning situation for the Hotel industry in our community and our students. The advanced graduate program, consisting of Masters’ education courses, advanced hotel management courses, and advanced related Hotel/ hospitality management courses, seeks to provide the student with the knowledge and skills to be successful in the advanced work environment.

 

The doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in Hotel Management (HM) Students will be taken on an advanced tours via the Internet, guest speakers and a field trip to explore the scoop of the Hotel/ hospitality industry. During this exploration, the students will be able to explain how food service and hotel operations interrelate and discuss current and future trends that will impact how business is conducted.

 

Degree Requirements

The Masters of Art Degree in Hotel Management are designed for those seeking employment in supervisory positions or for those currently employed in the hotel industry, an opportunity for job advancement, professional growth and career mobility. The Masters of Art Degree in Hotel Management  emphasis, is specifically designed for the student  who intends to transfer to The doctor of philosophy (Ph.D.) in Hotel Management (HM) at Covenant International University.  This MA degree is fully articulated with Covenant International University, College of Hotel/ hospitality, Tourism and Hotel Management.

Emphases

Some of The Doctors of philosophy (Ph.D.) in Hotel Management (HM) emphasis will be concentrate their studies in a number of available emphases, including: Facilities Management; Strategy, Operations Management, Institutional Management, Management Information Systems, Hotel Real Estate Management; Branding; Marketing and Consumer Behavior, Revenue Management, Financial Management, human Resources Management; New Product Development.

 

Funding

The program typically takes about two years to complete, including successful candidacy and comprehensive exams and thesis. Most students admitted into the Ph.D. program will be fully funded for two years, with satisfactory progress. During a students’ second year, there might be an opportunity to teach an undergraduate course and be compensated for such efforts.

 

SOME RELEVENAT SELF STUDY OBJECTIVES

UNIT 1: INTRODUCTION TO HOTEL/ HOTEL/ HOSPITALITY

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the scope of the Hotel/ hospitality industry.
  2. Categorize the businesses and organizations that are part of the Hotel/ hospitality and

tourism industry.

  1. Explain how Hotel/ hospitality businesses and organizations are related to one another.
  2. Discuss the reasons why people travel.
  3. Discuss the historical development of Hotel/ hospitality and tourism
  4. Explain the foodservice industry’s relationship to world history.
  5. List famous chefs from history and identify their major accomplishments.
  6. Identify U.S. cuisines.
  7. List current trends in society and explain how they influence the hotel and Food service industry.
  8. Investigate and analyze the impact of future economic, technological, and social changes in the Hotel/ hospitality industry.
  9. Explain how lodging operations interrelate to other Hotel/ hospitality organizations.
  10. Outline the different managed services segments
  11. Describe factors that distinguish managed services operations from commercial ones.
  12. Explain the need for managed services in elementary schools, secondary and post

secondary schools.

  1. Discuss the functions of ratings organizations.
  2. Explain how foodservice operations interrelate to the hotel and other Hotel/ hospitality

Organizations.

  1. List the departmental segments in a hotel and describe the functions of each
  2. List job and career opportunities on the entry-level, skilled-level and managerial

level in the Hotel/ hospitality industry.

  1. Create a career ladder.
  2. Asses the strengths and weaknesses of Hotel/ hospitality careers.

 

UNIT 2: FOOD SAFETY MANAGEMENT

GOAL: This 16-20 hour unit will enable students to achieve multiple goals. Not only

will they learn how to prepare and serve food safely, but they will also learn how to avoid

food safety risks in a food service operation. If the student opts to pay the fee to take the

Certification exam, their five year certification will not only make them a valuable asset

to their internship, but will earn them college credit as well.

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Analyze the reasons for foodborne illness outbreaks.
  2. Identify the characteristics of potentially hazardous food.
  3. Explain a manager’s responsibility to provide food safety training.
  4. Identify factors that affect the growth of foodborne pathogens
  5. Identify major foodborne illnesses caused by bacteria and their symptoms.
  6. Identify characteristics of these foodborne pathogens including sources, food involved in outbreaks, and methods of prevention.
  7. Identify the eight most common allergens, associated symptoms, and methods of prevention.
  8. Identify biological, chemical, and physical contaminants.
  9. Identify methods to prevent contamination from these sources.
  10. Identify criteria for accepting or rejecting common and special foods.
  11. Demonstrate how to properly store all food forms.
  12. Identify safe methods for thawing food.
  13. Identify methods for preventing contamination and time and temperature abuse when preparing food.
  14. Identify the minimum internal cooking temperatures and times for potentially hazardous foods.
  15. Identify proper procedures and time and temperature requirements for cooling foods.
  16. Identify requirements for reheating potentially hazardous foods.
  17. Identify time and temperature requirements for cold and hot holding potentially

hazardous foods.

  1. Identify the requirements for using time rather than temperature as the only method

of control when holding ready-to-eat foods.

  1. Identify the hazards when transporting foods and ways to prevent them.
  2. Identify the importance of active managerial control.
  3. Identify HACCP principles for preventing foodborne illness.
  4. Implement HACCP principles for a foodservice operation.
  5. Identify necessary components of a crisis-management system.
  6. Explain cooperation procedures with regulatory agencies.
  7. Explain and demonstrate the difference between cleaning and sanitizing.
  8. Discuss proper storage of clean and sanitized items.
  9. Identify storage requirements of cleaning chemicals.
  10. Identify requirements of an integrated pest management program.
  11. Differentiate between pest prevention and control.

 

UNIT 3: WORKPLACE SAFETY & SECURITY

GOAL: Students will investigate governmental regulations imposed on the Hotel/ hospitality

industry in order to maintain a safe environment for employees, guests, and customers.

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Discuss who is legally responsible for providing a safe work environment.
  2. Define the role of Occupational Safety and Health administration (OSHA)

regulations.

  1. Identify the Hazard Communication Standard requirements for employers.
  2. Identify the requirements for storing hazardous chemicals in an operation.
  3. Discuss how protective clothing and equipment prevent injuries.
  4. Classify the different types of fires and fire extinguishers.
  5. Identify electrical hazards that contribute to accidental fires.
  6. Outline frequency cleaning schedule for equipment fire prevention.
  7. Outline proper actions to take in the event of a fire.
  8. Describe ways to prevent burns.
  9. List hazards that contribute to injury due to slips or falls.
  10. Outline proper procedures for cleaning up spills on floors.
  11. Demonstrate how to use ladders safely.
  12. Describe safe methods for lifting, carrying, and moving heavy items.
  13. Demonstrate safe use of electrical equipment.
  14. Demonstrate safe use of knives.
  15. Outline basic first aid concepts and procedures.
  16. Explain CPR and the Heimlich maneuver.
  17. Identify external threats to an operation.
  18. List safe driving techniques.
  19. Describe the role of the front office in security.
  20. Explain how key control measures and locking systems protect guests.
  21. Create a plan for front desk surveillance and access control.
  22. Describe how to protect guest’s valuables
  23. Identify activities that are suspicious.
  24. Describe how to minimize guest and employee theft.
  25. Explain the importance of a safety audit.
  26. Explain the importance of completing standard reports for accidents or illnesses.
  27. List ways to use protective clothing and equipment to prevent injuries.
  28. Discuss elements of an emergency response plan.

 

Unit 4: FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT

GOAL: Students will receive hands-on training on how to operate, clean, and sanitize

major pieces of commercial foodservice equipment. Additionally, students will receive

hands-on training in knife care and usage.

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Identify common and specialty commercial kitchen equipment used for receiving,

storing, preparation, holding, and serving food.

  1. Explain and demonstrate how to operate, dismantle, clean, and sanitize common

and specialty commercial kitchen equipment.

  1. Identify common commercial and specialty kitchen tools.
  2. Identify basic commercial kitchen pots and pans
  3. Identify storage equipment for hot, cold and dry foods.
  4. Compare and contrast the features of commercial automatic dishwashing

machines.

  1. Discuss the purpose of the 3-compartment sink.
  2. Identify kitchen hand tools, small wares, and utensils.
  3. Discuss safe knife usage.
  4. Demonstrate knife care and skills.
  5. Compare and contrast the features of dishwashing machines.
  6. Discuss the purpose of the 3-compartment sink.

 

UNIT: 5 KITCHEN ESSENTIALS 1

GOAL: Students will learn the basics of professional cooking through hands-on

application of commercial cooking methods, use of standardized recipes, recipe

conversion, and portion control.

 

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Define the term professionalism and discuss its application to the foodservice

industry.

  1. Explain the kitchen brigade system.
  2. Explain the dining room brigade system.
  3. Define the concept of mise en place.
  4. Demonstrate professional organization in the kitchen
  5. Explain the basic math concepts used in standardized recipes.
  6. Demonstrate understanding of the metric system by calculating conversions

into US measurements.

  1. Identify common weight and measures.
  2. Identify common weight and measures abbreviations.
  3. Identify measuring and portioning devices
  4. Explain the importance of using portioning devices
  5. Demonstrate measuring and portioning foods with scales, ladles, measuring

cups and spoons and scoops.

  1. Determine AP and EP amounts.
  2. Discuss the problems and limitations of written recipes.
  3. Discuss the importance of using judgment when cooking.
  4. Discuss the components and functions of standardized recipes.
  5. Explain terms associated with recipe usage.
  6. Convert recipes to yield larger and smaller quantities.

 

UNIT: 6 KITCHEN ESSENTIALS 2

 

GOAL: Students will continue to learn the basics of professional cooking through a

study of taste sensations, application of herbs and spices, prepreparation techniques,

cooking methods, and application of healthy nutrition practices.

 

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Identify the four taste sensations on the tongue.
  2. Explain the basic principles of the physiology of the sense of taste and smell.
  3. Discuss the difference between seasoning and flavoring.
  4. Identify a variety of herbs, spices, oils, vinegars, wines and other flavorings.
  5. Compare fresh herbs and spices.
  6. Discuss the origin and ethnic identity of major herbs and spices.
  7. Identify other seasoning and flavoring ingredients.
  8. Experiment on how to use flavoring ingredients to create, enhance or alter the

natural flavors of a dish.

  1. Summarize the effects of heat on food.
  2. Describe dry-heat cooking methods and list the foods to which they are suited.
  3. Describe moist-heat cooking methods and list the foods to which they are suited.
  4. Describe combination cooking methods and list the foods to which they are

suited.

  1. Explain how to tell when a product has achieved the desired doneness.
  2. State the guidelines for plating and storing cooked food.
  3. Discuss prepreparation techniques using in cooking.
  4. Identify components of a healthy diet.
  5. Discuss how to use the Dietary Guidelines for Americans to plan menu items.
  6. Explain MyPyramid.
  7. Discuss nutritional labeling and how it is used.
  8. Define obesity and discuss ways it can be prevented.

 

UNIT: 7 COMMUNICATIONS

 

GOAL: Students will engage in hands on activities to demonstrate their knowledge in

resolving guest and customer complaints.

 

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Explain the communication process
  2. Identify successful communication skills.
  3. Identify ways that managers can improve communication skills.
  4. Outline barriers to effective communication.
  5. Identify effective listening and speaking skills.
  6. Demonstrate effective listening and speaking skills.
  7. Outline tips for effective speaking.
  8. List and describe parts of a formal presentation.
  9. Demonstrate use of visual aids effectively.
  10. Demonstrate use of voice and body language effectively.
  11. List skills needed for effective business writing.
  12. Demonstrate effective writing skills.
  13. List and Demonstrate courteous telephone skills.
  14. Explain the importance of good writing
  15. Describe the guidelines for better business writing
  16. List basic business writing rules.
  17. Write a standard business memo or e-mail.
  18. Write a standard business letter.

 

UNIT 8: STOCKS, SAUCES & SOUPS

GOAL: Students will identify the basic stock, soup, and sauce categories, and discuss

their relationships to one another. Students will also demonstrate their culinary skills in

preparing stocks, soups and sauces

 

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Identify the four essential parts of stock and stock ingredients.
  2. Identify stock parts and their ingredients.
  3. Discuss the reasons for each ingredient.
  4. Discuss and demonstrate the preparation of stocks.
  5. Discuss how to degrease a stock.
  6. Compare convenience bases and stocks.
  7. Discuss H.A.C.C.P. safety during the cooling and storing
  8. Demonstrate how to prepare a stock.
  9. Identify grand or mother sauces.
  10. Identify small sauces made from a grand sauce
  11. Identify components of a sauce.
  12. Discuss sauce qualities.
  13. Identify types of thickening agents used in sauces.
  14. Demonstrate how to prepare a white, blond, or brown roux.
  15. Discuss components of a quality sauce
  16. Explain how to prepare Veloute and Béchamel sauces.
  17. Discuss other uses for Veloute and Béchamel sauces.
  18. Demonstrate how to prepare Veloute and Béchamel sauces.
  19. Prepare a small sauce from a Veloute sauce.
  20. Identify the basic soup categories and give examples of each.
  21. Discuss soup garnish and service.
  22. Compare convenience packaged soups to ones made from stock.
  23. Prepare a soup from selected recipes
  24. Demonstrate H.A.C.C.P. safety during preparation, cooking, and holding times.
  25. Identify the qualities of a consommé.
  26. Explain the preparation of a consommé.

 

UNIT 9: FRONT OFFICE

GOAL: Students will demonstrate the skills necessary to care for guests during the guest

cycle handled by the front office department in a hotel.

Stages in the Guest Cycle

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. List the events that occur during pre-arrival.
  2. Outline the activities occurring during the arrival stage.
  3. Describe the tasks performed during the occupancy state.
  4. Outline check-out procedures.

 

Types of Reservations

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the various reservations used in a hotel.
  2. Differentiate between binding and non-binding reservation agreements.
  3. Describe sources of reservations and their various networks.

The Reservations Process

 

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

Students will be able to identify the steps in the reservation process

Forecasting

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of forecasting.
  2. Demonstrate how to develop a forecasting report.

 

Using a Property Management System

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify components of a specific Property Management software system
  2. Demonstrate how use the software.

 

Revenue Management

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Learn how to read, and then make adjustments to a hotel’s occupancy forecast.
  2. Interpret data on an occupancy forecast
  3. Apply room rate strategies so as to estimate rooms revenue
  4. Demonstrate how to modify an occupancy forecast by entering group block information into the forecast.
  5. Analyze group block information and its relation to rooms available to sell.
  6. Demonstrate how to modify an occupancy forecast by entering group block information into the forecast.
  7. Analyze group block information and its relation to rooms available to sell.

 

Reservation Management

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to::

  1. Identify the functions and purpose of pre-registration.
  2. Demonstrate how to obtain room availability information.
  3. Interpret rate schedules.
  4. Differentiate room rate applications.
  5. Demonstrate how to retrieve and modify as reservation
  6. Identify procedures for making a “group block” reservation using a PMS.
  7. Demonstrate how to make a “group block” reservation using a PMS.
  8. Identify components of a group “master” reservation.
  9. Demonstrate how to make a group “master reservation.
  10. Students will demonstrate how to retrieve and then modify a group “master reservation.
  11. Demonstrate how to adjust room rates using PMS based upon the room demand

levels forecasted for those dates.

Guest Stay Information

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify components in a housekeeping report.
  2. Demonstrate how to use the information to update guest room status using a PMS.
  3. Demonstrate how to create a work schedule using a PMS that details the number

of attendant hours that will be required to fully staff a given date.

  1. Identify ways to upsell a guest to a higher rate category.
  2. Identify steps to assist walk-in guests who cannot be accommodated.
  3. Identify steps to help non-guaranteed reservations who must be turned away.
  4. List procedures to follow when there is no room for a guest with a guaranteed reservation.
  5. Demonstrate how to assign arriving guests to their requested ready and vacant

rooms using a PMS.

  1. Identify methods of payment used to secure a room
  2. Describe steps to verify the validity of a debit or credit card
  3. Describe check accepting procedures.
  4. Outline special programs that guests may use to pay for a hotel stay.
  5. Describe policies governing the issuing of a room key.
  6. Demonstrate how to assign arriving guests to a ready and vacant room when their original request is not available.
  7. Analyze the impact on room reassignment has on the hotel and the guest.
  8. Identify types of folios.
  9. Describe the types of entries that can be made into accounts.

 

Guest Departure and Payment

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify activities involved at guest checkout.
  2. Identify steps to update room status.
  3. Explain the importance of creating a guest history record
  4. List departure procedures.
  5. Demonstrate how to keep guest records up-to-date by posting transactions to active guests’ folios.
  6. Explain why hotels may charge late check-out fees
  7. Describe express check-out options.
  8. Describe self-check-out procedures.
  9. Students will demonstrate how to adjust charges from guest’s bills.
  10. List the steps involved in internal control
  11. Describe procedures for cash banks
  12. Explain why hotels audit financial records.
  13. Identify steps in a daily operations report.
  14. Demonstrate how to calculate occupancy ratios.
  15. Analyze room revenue
  16. Interpret room’s division budget reports.
  17. How to close guest folios.
  18. How to split charges on guest folios.
  19. Identify ways to handle disputes guests may have regarding charges on their folios.

 

Audit Overview

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Students will identify functions of a front office audit.
  2. Identify components of a shift report.
  3. Identify how to sum up each transaction group to balance and close out a single shift.
  4. Demonstrate how to correct an “out-of-balance” shift
  5. Demonstrate how to balance a full day’s shift or night audit.
  6. Demonstrate how to reconcile a guest ledger.
  7. Identify the effect that guest transactions have on the guest ledger.
  8. Demonstrate how to reconcile a city ledger.
  9. Identify the effect that non-guest transactions have on the city ledger.
  10. Identify data that needs to be supplied in a Manager’s Daily Report
  11. Demonstrate that they can apply their previous acquired knowledge of hotel

operations by inserting missing data into a manager’s daily report.

  1. Identify the term, “Competitive set”
  2. Explain the performance indices when comparing property to other hotels:
  • ADR
  • Occupancy percentage
  • RevPar

UNIT 10: HOUSEKEEPING MANAGEMENT

 

GOAL: The unit is introduced to the student by way of a field trip to a local hotel mentor. Specifically the student will tour the departments of housekeeping and laundry. They will be able to discuss information on how to manage the individual units as well as receive hands-on experience in activities such as bed making, stocking housekeeping carts, vacuuming and room inspections. The field trip excursion will be used as a tool to enhance later classroom activities. Students will be able to relate the vital importance of the housekeeping department to the hotel establishment.

The Housekeeping Department

The Department

 

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of the housekeeping department.
  2. Identify typical cleaning responsibilities for the housekeeping department.

Planning

 

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Create an inventory list of work to be performed.
  2. Create a frequency schedule.
  3. Develop performance standards.
  4. Implements productivity standards.

Staffing and Scheduling

 

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Distinguish between fixed and variable staff positions.
  2. Develop a staffing guide for room attendants.
  3. Develop a staffing guide for other housekeeping positions.
  4. Develop employee work schedules.
  5. Identify alternative scheduling techniques.

Carpet Construction and Maintenance

Carpet Construction

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Describe how the carpets face affects its durability.
  2. Identify the types of primary backings.
  3. Explain how secondary backings are applied to carpets.

Carpet Problems

 

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain proper carpet care.
  2. Identify problems in carpet care and discuss their solutions.

Carpet Maintenance

 

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain how to use floor plans and calendars to schedule maintenance.
  2. Describe how routine inspections are part of a carpet and floor care program.
  3. Explain how preventive maintenance can prolong the life of carpets.
  4. Describe how routine maintenance of carpets in performed at a property.

Carpet Cleaning Methods

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain proper vacuuming procedures.
  2. Identify when to use dry powder cleaning methods.
  3. Explain the use of bonnet spin pad cleaning equipment.
  4. Describe the use of rotary shampoo equipment.
  5. Describe water extraction techniques.

Housekeeping Inventory

Types of Inventory

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify recycled inventories and how they are maintained.
  2. Explain how the housekeeping department maintains non-recycled inventory.
  3. Calculate expected inventories.

Cleaning Supplies

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify types of cleaning supplies.
  2. Establish inventory levels for cleaning supplies.
  3. Control cleaning supply inventories.

Linen Inventory and Control

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify types of linens.
  2. Establish par levels for linens.
  3. Describe procedures for effective inventory control of linens.
  4. Take a physical inventory of linens.

Linen Purchases

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Describe the purchasing responsibilities of the executive housekeeper.
  2. Identify factors to consider when determining the size of an annual linen purchase.
  3. Evaluate the quality of linens and their long-term costs.
  4. Control linen purchases as they are received.

Guest Room Cleaning

 

Preparation

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify guestroom-cleaning supplies.
  2. Identify room attendant cart organization.

 

Room Assignments

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Interpret a room status report
  2. Complete a room assignment sheet.
  3. Identify the order in which guest rooms should be cleaned.

 

Cleaning Procedures

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify how to enter a room properly.
  2. Identify cleaning tasks and their order of completion.
  3. Identify steps in making a bed properly.
  4. Identify procedures for cleaning a bathroom safely.

 

Inspection

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain why guestrooms are inspected.
  2. Identify procedures in a room inspection.
  3. Identify technology affecting room inspections.

 

On-Premises Laundry Management

The Laundry Cycle

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the characteristics of fabric used in a hotel facility.
  2. List the steps in the laundry cycle.
  3. List requirements of linen sorting.
  4. Explain proper procedure for storing laundry.

 

Chemical Use

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the chemicals used in the laundry department.
  2. Describe the function each laundry chemical.

 

Equipment Use and Maintenance

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify types of washing and drying machines used in a hotel.
  2. Describe how steam cabinets and tunnels work.
  3. Explain the function of flatwork ironers and pressing machines.
  4. Explain how a folding machine works.
  5. Outline the importance of a preventative maintenance program.

 

UNIT: 11 FRUITS AND VEGETABLES

GOAL: Students will participate in many hands-on activities that explore the varieties of fruits and vegetables and how to cook them safely.

Objectives: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Identify, describe, and demonstrate the preparation of different types of fruits.
  2. Identify, describe, and demonstrate the preparation of different types of vegetables.
  3. List and explain quality grades for fresh fruits and vegetables.
  4. Summarize ways to prevent fruits and vegetables from spoiling too quickly.
  5. Match and cook fruits to appropriate methods.
  6. Explain how to prevent enzymatic browning of fruits.
  7. Match and cook vegetables to appropriate methods.

 

UNIT 12: POTATOES AND FARINACEOUS FOODS

GOAL: After distinguishing between the various types of potatoes, grains, legumes and pastas, students will apply classical cooking techniques using selected recipes containing

these foods.

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Outline methods to select, receive, and store potatoes and grains.
  2. Identify and describe different types of potatoes.
  3. Using a variety of recipes and cooking techniques, prepare potatoes.
  4. Identify and describe different types of grains and legumes.
  5. Using a variety of recipes and cooking techniques, prepare grains and legumes.
  6. Identify and describe different types of pasta.
  7. Using a variety of recipes and cooking techniques, prepare pasta.

 

UNIT 13: Guest and Customer Service Unit Page

GOAL: Students will acquire strategic business planning skills necessary to market an intangible product like service so as to ensure an operation’s profitability. Students will devise plans to anticipate, meet, and exceed guest expectations so as to guarantee quality service for a diverse population. This will be done through role plays, investigations through use of the Internet and other business resources, guest speakers, and scenario analysis activities that will also prepare them for management activities and competitions. In order to impact a keen awareness of good customer service, students will keep and share a diary of their personal customer service encounters. The diary will serve as an evaluative vehicle for the students to study how the service made them feel, did it meet their expectations, and what, if any, changes could be made to make it better. The Service “Industry

 

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify the elements of good service.
  2. Distinguish between marketing tangible products and intangible products.
  3. Describe the involvement of customers in service.
  4. Explain how to maintain quality control of the service product

 

The Importance of Customer Service

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss the importance of service and Hotel/ hospitality.
  2. Distinguish between a guest and a customer.
  3. Describe special needs of customers.

 

Identify Ways to Achieve Exceptional Service

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of strategic planning, missions, and objectives
  2. List the steps needed in a strategic planning process.
  3. Define moments of truth.

 

Develop Service Strategies to Deliver Service

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Describe strategies used for managing supply.
  2. Discuss how to manage demand at Hotel/ hospitality properties.
  3. Explain how to control payroll expenses.
  4. Describe how to target a market segment.
  5. List ways to set service standards.
  6. List tangible things a hotel can do to provide good service

 

UNIT 14: THE ART OF SERVICE

GOAL: Students will discuss and demonstrate the similarities and differences between,

American, French, English, Russian, banquet, buffet and quick-service styles.

Additionally, students will dramatize effective ways for verbal marketing and discuss

liability laws in beverage service.

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, student will demonstrate the ability to:

  1. Contrast traditional and contemporary service staff positions, and list the duties and

responsibilities of each.

  1. Identify the various types of dining utensils.
  2. Identify server tools and the stations.
  3. Describe the similarities and differences between American, French, English,

Russian, banquet, buffet,  and quick-service styles.

  1. Explain and demonstrate American, French, and Russian service.
  2. Demonstrate common service techniques.
  3. List information shared during the pre-shift meeting and discuss its importance.
  4. Identify the importance of service guarantees.
  5. Describe and dramatize the components of suggestive selling.
  6. Discuss ways to determine customer satisfaction.
  7. Identify and demonstrate proper procedures for processing payment
  8. Discuss types of liability laws.
  9. Discuss alcohol service issues.

Unit 15: HOTEL/ HOSPITALITY RESOURCES

GOAL: Students will become acquainted with professional organizations that relate to

their Hotel/ hospitality career interest. Students will engage in a higher level of career

exploration by researching membership into related professional organizations,

Hotel/ hospitality colleges  and universities and scholarships. Students will recognize the

importance of their involvement and networking with these organizations as it relates to

their life long learning.

Objectives: At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Explain what a professional organization is.
  2. Explain the importance of being involved in professional organizations.
  3. Explain the importance of networking.
  4. Begin making networking contacts.
  5. Identify Hotel/ hospitality professional organizations and their respective associate and

allied networks.

 

UNIT 16: HOTEL/ HOSPITALITY CAREER DEVELOPMENT

GOAL: After analyzing their interests and values, students will learn how to promote

themselves in a professional manner by way of developing a resume and a portfolio and

engage in interviewing activities so as to equip them the job and career selection process.

Assignments will help students prepare for their first internship in Hotel/ hospitality.

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Develop a self-assessment of their individual strengths, weaknesses, interests, and values.
  2. Identify sources of information on organizations and positions.
  3. Explain the importance of networking.
  4. Develop a list of networking contacts and begin making connections.
  5. Write a cover letter.
  6. Prepare for initial and second interviews.
  7. Write a think-you letter.
  8. Discuss how to handle rejection.
  9. Negotiate and choose the best job offer.
  10. Develop a career portfolio.
  11. Identify the seven habits of highly effective people.
  12. Work successfully on the job.

 

Self-Assessment

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify their strengths and weaknesses.
  2. Identify their interests and values.
  3. Identify sources of information on organizations and positions.

 

Self-Marketing and Personal Promotion

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to

  1. Demonstrate business writing skills by writing a cover letter.
  2. Demonstrate self-marketing skills by preparing a resume and portfolio.

 

Interviewing

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Read and complete job application forms accurately.
  2. Prepare for an interview.
  3. Anticipate interview questions.
  4. Recognize illegal interview questions.
  5. Discuss how to question interviewers.
  6. Write a thank-you letter.
  7. Prepare for a second interview.

 

Responding to Job Offers

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Discuss how to handle rejection.
  2. Describe how to evaluate a job offer.
  3. Discuss how to choose the best job offer.
  4. Negotiate a job offer.

 

Lifelong Learning

Objectives: At the completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  1. Identify and give examples of positive work attitudes.
  2. Follow the seven habits of highly effective people.
  3. Career plan beyond the first job.
  4. Discuss how to complete college applications and scholarship forms.

 

UNIT 17: MANAGEMENT ESSENTIALS

GOAL: This unit is a brief introduction to the major Hotel/ hospitality management unit that

will be taught in year two of the Hotel and Restaurant Management Academy. The

details of chapter 8 in the text, Foundations of Restaurant Management & Culinary Arts,

Level One, are combined and will be taught in its entirety with the Lodging Management

Curriculum.

OBJECTIVES: At the completion of this unit, students will be able to:

  1. Identify components of a good work atmosphere.
  2. Identify skills needed to be a successful leader.
  3. Identify skills needed for interviewing and orientating new employees.
  4. Identify skills needed for training and evaluating employees.

 

Courses:

The online curriculum offers an innovative approach to higher education. Enrollment is open and students may begin the program at any time. All courses are provided in online, with on-to-one faculty mentoring whenever needed. Students also have free access to our comprehensive Resources Center of THINKWAVE, with links to subject and grades or other related web sites, online libraries.

 

 

Transcripts showing student progress are submitted after the mid-term exams and final Transcripts are submitted at the close of each semester.

 

Graduation

For graduation, a student must have at least a cumulative grade point average of 2.00.Graduation with honor will be determined according to the following standards:

Honor  Cumulative Grade   Point Average

Cum Laude      3.57 – 3.69

Magna cum Laude      3.70 – 3.89

Summa cum Laude     3.90 – 4.00

 

GRADING GUIDELINE:

 

WRITTEN ASSIGNMENTS:

There are several written assignments for this Degree. There is a Considerable amount of writing involved in this degree, and we would prefer you to spend your time with the book learning the materials and practicing the self-study problems or your research papers at the end of each week on which the assignment is due. All monthly assignments are due on or before 12mid-night of the last Friday the assignment is due.  All Assignment must be submitted directly to the Professor’s email not the School’s email.

 

All Assigned Topic must be typed, double spaced. (At least 30 Pages with at least 25 references).

 

 TOPICS DUE DATES PROFESSORS
  1. FUNCTIONS AND TYPES OF HOTEL
APRIL 5TH
  • Hotels as business within the Hotel Industry
  • Hotels and other Accommodation providers
  • Describing and rating of Hotels
  • Describing hotels for advertising and publicity purposes
  • Why people travel their motivations.
  1. HOTEL ORGANISATION, MANAGEMENT AND STAFF
JUNE 17TH
  • Hotel, departments according to services provided:
  • Accommodation services
  • Food and beverage services
  • Support services
  • Organization chart
  • The organization and management of a small and big hotel
  • Duties and responsibilities of staff
  • Recruitment of staff
  • Staff training
  • Gratuities or service charge
  • Computerization in hotels.
  1. THE HOTEL  RECEPTION
AUGUST 14TH
  • Creating a good first impression on visitors
  • Why the reception is the information centre
  • Shape, size, location or positioning furning
  • Why the reception a focal point of guest relations
  • Personal qualities needed by good reception
  • Dealing with guests complaints
  • Answering queries and providing information about the hotel itself
  • Guest billing and accounting
  • Uniform staff and their duties.
  1. HOTEL BEDROOMS AND BATHROOMS
OCT 12TH
  • Guest requirement and expectations
  • Single, double and family rooms
  • Single occupancy supplement
  • Desirable features of hotel bedroom furniture
  • Guest bathroom and toilets.
  1. HOTEL PRODUCTS AND MARKETS
DEC 11TH
PART A – MARKET
  • The marketing concept
  • A conceptual model of the hotel market
  • The market feasibility study
PART B – THE INVESTMENT
  • Some aspects of the market
  • Six critical areas
PART C – THE DESIGN
  • People and places
  • The design criteria
  • Applying the criteria – an approach
PART D – THE MANAGEMENT OF THE PLANNING TASK
  • Organization theory
  • The technical of planning
  • Sequence and method
  1. HOTEL HOUSE KEEPING
FEB 12TH
  • The role of house keeping
  • Organization of the housekeeping department
  • Room status classifications
  • Computerized rooms management system
  1. HOTEL CATERING
APRIL 4TH
  • Meals: breakfast, lunch, brunch, dinner, afternoon tea
  • Room rates which include meals
  • Bed and breakfast, half board, full board, menus
  • Types of customers for catering.
JUNE 14TH
  1. EMPLOYEE SKILLS
  • Profiles
  • Position descriptions
  • Job safety analysis
  • Training outlines
  • Training videos
  • Other systems
  • The hotel food chain
  • Food preparation
  • The hoteliers lien
  • Food cost control
  • Selling the prepared food
  • Menus content presentation and production
  • Menus variety, cyclical menus
  • Menu for quality and haute cuisine restaurants
  • Food service styles
  • Table wear
  • Table service
  • Qualities required and training
  • Position and duties in the hierarchy
  • Personal hygiene
  • Payment for food
  • Function catering
  • Staff catering
8A    BEVERAGES AUGUST 31
  • Types of beverages
  • Hotels bars
  • Sales of beverages in hotel restaurants
  • Beverage vending machines
  • Purchasing alcoholic and non alcoholic beverages
  • Storing alcoholic and non – alcoholic beverages
  • Units by which beverages can be sold
  • Payments for beverages in bars and in restaurants
  • Alternatives to waiter room service.
  1. FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING
OCT 17TH
  • The importance to management of complete and accurate financial statements
  • Practical example of a small business
  • Receipts and payments statement
  • Revenue and expenditure statement
  • Meaning of some commonly used accounting terms
  • The balance sheet
  1. OTHER GUEST SERVICE
DEC 5TH
  • Additional facilities guests may look for in hotels
  • Types of merchandise and services which may be provided to guest by tenant
  • Other revenue – earring uses of excess hotel space
  • Guest telephone services
  • In-house provision of ancillary services
  • Guest laundry and valeting services
  • Directory of services
  1. BUSINESS OWNERSHIP AS IT CONCERNS HOTELS
FEB 6TH
  • Sole proprietor businesses
  • Partnerships
  • Limited liability companies
  • Functionaries
  1. HOTEL AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP
MARCH 31ST
  • Hotel, economic development and entrepreneurial activity
  • The role of entrepreneurship in hotel development
  • The nature and characteristics of hotel entrepreneurs
  • The hotel labour markets.

 

39 UPPER WATERLOO STREET

FREETOWN, SIERRA LEONE

CONTACT: REV. DR. MORRIS DURMAN, PHD

UNIVERSITY VICE PRESIDENT

+232-77-832676

+232-78-927700

Website: www.covenant-university.com

appcius@gmail.com

photo 1

SIERRA LEONE

photo 2

Sierra Leone Diamond Mines – Sierra Leone Diamonds – Zimbio

photo 3

Caption: Congo Town Bridge (Sierra Leone Mountain Railway)

photo 4

the highest mountain range in the West African country of Sierra Leone

photo 5

Sierra Leone‘s parliament building

photo 6

SIERRA LEONE

photo 7

 

Site Created by IPC 832.206.0128 www.ipcservices.us